Program Syllabi Cover Page for:
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training


Program Objective:

The Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training program is dedicated to serving truth seekers who want to spread the light of divine consciousness and joy with others in a deeply meaningful and yet practical way. Our goal is to train experienced yoga teachers to become competent yoga therapists within the tradition of Ananda Yoga and its focus on guiding people towards ever higher expressions of themselves in body, mind and spirit.

Ananda Yoga® Therapy is based in the teachings of Raja Yoga as interpreted by Paramhansa Yogananda and his direct disciple Swami Kriyananda. Our focus is on practical application of those teachings to everyday life. We view physical, psychological, and spiritual wellness as inseparable, and therefore use therapeutic yoga tools to help people heal on all of these levels.

All instructors and staff are people who have applied these techniques to their own life journey for many years and are passionate about helping others take their next step forward toward radiant health, lasting happiness, and Self-realization.

Program Overview & Schedule:

The Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training is a modular program, requiring a minimum of two years for completion. The following courses comprise our curriculum, and the recommended schedule for taking the courses is outlined below. We work closely with our students to help them determine which courses would be best for them to take when, in accordance with their personal schedules of family and work-life, their experience as yoga teachers, and their finances.

The Essence of the Bhagavad Gita
The Essence of the Yoga Sutras
Ananda Meditation® Teacher Training 1
Advanced Pranayama
Ananda Spiritual Counseling® Training
AYTT Assistantship
Home Practice Video

The following courses comprise our Core Yoga Therapy courses:
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Principles
Restorative Ananda Yoga® Teacher Training
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Seniors & Bone Strength
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Musculoskeletal–1
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Ayurveda
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Health Challenges–1
Ananda Meditation® Solutions
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Psychology & Mental Health: Exploring Yogic, Ayurvedic & Western Perspectives
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Health Challenges–2
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Musculoskeletal–2
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Holistic Health Therapist Training
Mid-Curriculum: Home Practicum—Video

The Individual Course Syllabi are all in the same format so that each one is readily cross-referenced to the Competency Chart. Each Syllabus has the course name (as above and in the competency chart) and indicates the Course Total Hours followed by the Contact Hours and the Non-Contact Hours. Following this are the Practicum Total Hours and the number of Contact and Non-Contact hours associated with them. The Practicum Contact Hours are those which occur during each of the courses, with faculty present. The Practicum Non-Contact Hours are those which are done by students as part of their Home Practice Assignments. These are supervised by faculty from a distance via the submittal of written documentation by the students which are then reviewed by the faculty. Feedback from faculty is then returned to the students.

Course Completion Requirements (for Syllabi)

  • Attendance at all classes.
  • Completion of all assigned readings.
  • Participation in class discussions and activities (including case studies, review sessions, practicums). Participation needs to reflect that the student has learned and begun to assimilate the information from their assigned readings. (The faculty will be assessing whether the student has achieved the level of knowledge and appropriate application of that knowledge according to the IAYT Competencies that apply.)
  • Satisfactory performance on in-class (closed-book) Quizzes. This will indicate an achievement of the stated course Learning Objectives. Students will be given Answer Keys to the Quizzes immediately after taking them, and there will then be time for further Q & A and group discussion with faculty.
  • During in-class practicums, students must provide yoga therapy interventions in a safe and appropriate manner, in accordance with the IAYT Competencies for providing yoga therapy (Sections 4.1 & 4.2), as determined by supervising faculty. Students are given immediate feedback from faculty and peers on all aspects of their observational, assessment, decision-making, planning, teaching and record-keeping skills.
  • Satisfactory completion of the Home Practice Assignment. (see below) Students are given written feedback by supervising faculty, along with an offer to speak in person or by phone in addition. If the expected standard of satisfactory performance (set by IAYT Standards and Competencies) is not met, then students will be given additional guidance and assignments as needed until they can demonstrate the expected competency.
  • If any of the above requirements or expectations are not met, the student will be counseled and/or given additional assignments in order to help them be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance. If they still cannot demonstrate satisfactory competency, they will be asked to drop out of the program.

SYLLABUS
The Essence of the Bhagavad Gita

Course Hours: Total: 41 (Residential)

Prerequisite

Graduate of Ananda Yoga Teacher Training (200-hour), or
Graduate of a Yoga Alliance approved 200-hour Yoga Teacher Training

Teaching Format

This is a 7-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, and experiential advanced asana workshops.

Course Description

Students will learn how to unlock the secrets of this powerful scripture. Swami Kriyananda has called the Gita “the world’s greatest scripture” -- not that its teachings are “better” than other scriptures, but that those teachings are given in a way that is so direct, accessible, and doable. This full-immersion program will take participants into those teachings in a way that allows understanding not only intellectually, but intuitively and practically.

There are also several workshops in which participants explore the practice and teaching of a number of advanced asanas, and there is a class for those in the Yoga Therapy Training to explore the application of these teachings to the practice of yoga therapy.

Faculty: Ananda Ministers

Nayaswami Gyandev McCord, PhD, E-RYT 500, Director of Ananda Yoga
Nayaswami Diksha McCord, BSc, BFA, Level 2 Ananda Yoga Teacher, Director of Ananda Meditation Teacher Training
Nayaswami Mangala Loper-Powers, RN, MN, NP, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT, Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist, Ananda Minister

Required Texts/Reading Materials

The Essence of the Bhagavad Gita. Swami Kriyananda and Paramhansa Yogananda, Crystal Clarity Publishers, 2006
A Concise Bhagavad Gita, Nayaswami Gyandev McCord, Ways to Freedom, 2013

Learning Objectives

At the completion of the course, students will know:

  • How to recognize the inner battle of life and make the effort that will win it
  • The interplay of Prakriti and Purusha, and how that affects a person’s life
  • How the law of karma works, including the effects of vasanas and samskaras
  • How to use the workings of karma to one’s advantage
  • How to recognize and avoid a variety of psychological traps
  • The nature of right action
  • How to overcome desire, anger, and attachment
  • A deeper understanding of the paths of Karma, Gyana, Bhakti, and Raja Yoga
  • The three gunas: how they manifest in life and in people, and how they relate to improving one’s experience of life
  • Recognizing caste tendencies in oneself, and what to do to move to the next higher caste
  • How to get past attachment to experiencing pleasure and avoiding pain
  • What one can do when he bogs down, spiritually
  • How to deepen your relationship with God
  • How a yoga therapist applies the above knowledge to serving clients best interest

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered

Section 1: Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings & Philosophy
1.1.1 b. purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
d. guna (fundamental forces of nature); and
e. duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1.4 artha (cognition), bhava (mood), svabhava (inborn nature), vasana
(residue of experience), samskara (conditioned pattern of thinking
and behavior);
1.2.2.2 lobha, krodha, and moha (greed, anger, attachment)
1.2.2.3 duhkha and daurmanasya (suffering/discomfort and negative attitude/thinking),
sarupyam (identification with the contents of the mind or seer taking the same
form as the mind)
1.2.2.4 antaraya (obstacles to progress in yoga).

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Course Completion Requirements

Students have demonstrated understanding of course learning objectives by attendance at all lectures, participation in all discussions and asana workshops. Completion of required reading assignments.


SYLLABUS
The Essence of the Yoga Sutras

Course Hours: Total: 38 (Residential)

Prerequisite

Graduate of Ananda Yoga Teacher Training (200-hour), or
Graduate of a Yoga Alliance approved 200-hour Yoga Teacher Training

Teaching Format

This is a 6-day course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, and experiential advanced asana workshops.

Faculty: Ananda Ministers and Certified Meditation Teachers:

Nayaswami Pranaba Hansen, Kriyacharya, Certified 500 hr. Ananda Yoga Teacher
Nayaswami Parvati Hansen, Kriyacharya
Nayaswami Gyandev McCord, PhD, E-RYT 500, Director of Ananda Yoga, Kriyacharya
Nayaswami Mangala Loper-Powers, RN, MN, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT
Maitri Jones, RN, BSN, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT

Required Texts/Reading Materials

Kriyananda. Demystifying Patanjali : The Yoga Sutras (aphorisms). Nevada City: Crystal Clarity, 2013. (real the whole book)

Course Description

Patanjali, the great ancient exponent of yoga, described the stages of spiritual development for all seekers. These principles of yoga are based not on dogma, but on how we are made. This course explores these important subjects:

  • Ashtanga Yoga
  • Obstacles to Yoga
  • Samadhi
  • Attitude
  • Making Patanjali practical
  • How to teach advanced asanas
  • How to apply the teachings of the Sutras and especially the yamas and niyamas to the practice of yoga therapy

Learning Objectives

At the end of the course, students will know:

  1. How to use the Eightfold Path to enhance success for you and your clients on all levels including spiritually and in yoga therapy.
  2. What holds people back spiritually, and how to overcome it in yourself and how to help your clients.
  3. What is this state of Samadhi or Oneness, and how can you and your clients move toward an actual experience of it.
  4. How to help clients develop the attitudes essential for success on all levels of life.
  5. How to help clients integrate the essence of yoga into daily life.
  6. The essence of the yamas and niyamas and how they apply to an individual’s ability to achieve wellness on all levels.
  7. How a yoga therapist applies the above knowledge to serving clients’ best interests.

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1. Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya,Yoga,Tantra, and Ayurveda.
Examples of concepts and models from the above teachings and philosophy relevant to yoga therapy, include but are not limited to,
a.   tanmatra/bhuta/indriya (subtle element/gross elements/senses);
b.   purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
c.   pancamaya kosha (dimensions of the human system);
d.   guna (fundamental forces of nature); and
e.   duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1. Knowledge of yoga perspectives on the structure, states, functioning, and conditions of the mind, including, but not limited to,
1.2.1.1. drashtr (seer), drshya (seen);
1.2.1.2. antahkarana citta (consciousness), buddhi (intellect), ahamkara (ego), manas (mind);
1.2.1.3. citta vrtti (activities of the mind), citta parinama (structural changes in the mind), vyutthana/nirodha (mind's potential for distraction and focus);
1.2.1.4. artha (cognition), bhava (mood), svabhava (inborn nature), vasana (residue of experience), samskara (conditioned pattern of thinking and behavior); and
1.2.1.5. states of mind: mudha (stupefied/dull), kshipta (disturbed), vikshipta (alternating between distraction and focus), ekagrata (one-pointed), nirodha (focus enveloped/held/ restrained), vaishvanara (waking), taijasa (dream), prajña (deep sleep), turiya (beyond).
1.2.2. Knowledge of yoga perspectives on distracted/disturbed conditions of mind and their expressions as expressed in such texts as the Yoga Sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, and other texts, including but not limited to,
1.2.2.1. klesha (affliction);
1.2.2.2. lobha, krodha, and moha (greed, anger, attachment);
1.2.2.3. duhkha and daurmanasya (suffering/discomfort and negative attitude/thinking), sarupyam (identification with the contents of the mind or seer taking the same form as the mind); and
1.2.2.4. antaraya (obstacles to progress in yoga).

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Practices
3.1.1. In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
3.1.2. In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1. asana (postures);
3.1.2.2. pranayama (regulated breathing); 3.1.2.3. meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation), and ritualized activities such as nyasa and mudra; and
3.1.3. In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.
Category 3.3 Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.

Course Completion Requirements

Students have demonstrated understanding of course learning objectives by their attendance at all lectures, participation in all discussions and asana workshops. Completion of required book reading.


SYLLABUS
Ananda Meditation® Teacher Training Level 1


Course Contact Hours: 53 (Residential)

Prerequisite

Students need to be meditating daily for a minimum of ½ hr with the technique the course instructor sends them through MP3 with written instructions on how to follow. In most cases, students sign up for this course 2-3 months ahead of time and therefore have the time to do this. In some cases, we’ll accept students 1-2 weeks prior to class if necessary.

Teaching Format

This is a 12-day residential course, which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, experiential, practice teaching of the meditation technique, and student teachings. On three afternoons of the course we have the students teach each other, with supervision of qualified instructors. After that, one afternoon of the course, the students teach volunteer clients, with individual supervision in which at the end each student receives feedback from a senior faculty on how they did and how they can improve. There are two sessions in which each student gives a presentation on meditation, with an assigned topic to talk about. At the second presentation, each student receives feedback by a senior faculty on how they did, and how they can improve. Also each student has to submit a written exam at the end of the training.

Course Description

This course is focused primarily on teaching the students how to teach an ancient, universal technique of meditation, from India, but the training also includes many aspects of meditation, such as how to sit comfortably for meditation, how to guide through a variety of pranayama techniques, before meditation, how to lead affirmations and visualizations to aid meditation, and a variety of other related aspects, that can be helpful to the teaching of meditation.

This 12-day training provides a solid foundation for teaching both the science and the art of meditation. Our curriculum includes classes and workshops on these topics:

  • How to teach basic meditation skills to anyone
  • The essential connection of meditation and energy
  • Concentration techniques for quieting the mind
  • Patanjali’s Eight Limbed Yoga
  • How to teach breathing exercises, visualizations, walking meditations
  • Simple yoga stretches to prepare for meditation
  • How to sit comfortably for meditation
  • Opening the heart and developing devotion
  • The scientific effects of meditation on the brain and nervous system
  • Meditation and prayer
  • Meditation and intuition
  • Spiritual counseling suggestions
  • How to set up and market your classes

The spectrum of techniques we share during the training are based on the highest ancient yogic practices of India. Students practice and teach extensively during the training, with ample guidance and feedback from instructors. Our curriculum prepares students to teach meditation skills to anyone. We consider this to be one of the key skills of a yoga therapist.

In addition to inspiring classes offered by some of Ananda's finest and most experienced meditation teachers, students participate in daily meditations and Ananda Yoga® practices, and receive a comprehensive teaching manual. Graduates receive a Certificate of Completion and credits toward Level 2 yoga teacher certification and Ananda Yoga Therapy Training. Meditation Teacher Training is offered three times in 2018. Please see attached schedule for the general flow of the training.

Faculty: Ananda Ministers:

Nayaswami Diksha McCord, BSc, BFA, Level 2 Ananda Yoga & Meditation Teacher
Nayaswami Gyandev McCord, PhD, E-RYT 500, Director of Ananda Yoga Teacher Training, Kriyacharya

Learning Objectives

Students will know:

  • What meditation is and what it is not;
  • How to get comfortable for a silent, sitting meditation, and how to teach students to do the same;
  • How to use the breath to calm the body and mind;
  • Concentration techniques to overcome mental restlessness;
  • How to use affirmations, visualization, and walking meditations;
  • How to open the heart chakra and develop one’s feeling nature;
  • How to use music as an aid to meditation;
  • Effective presentation skills and how to overcome stage fright;
  • How to become a truly dynamic teacher;
  • How to organize and market your classes.
.

Required Texts/Reading Materials

Included as a part of the course is a 150-page Meditation Teacher’s Manual. Students are assigned required reading assignments from the manual’s Table of Contents.

Reading Assignments

MTT I Reading Assignments from Manual

WednesdaySection I 1.1The Basics of Meditation (1–8)
Section IV.What is a Yuga? (114-116)
ThursdaySection I 1.1The Basics of Meditation (9–13)
FridaySection III.Different States of Consciousness (86-89)
Levels of Consciousness
Benefits and Goals of Meditation (11-12, 96)
MondaySection I 1.3Obstacles to Meditation (34-35)
Section II 2.1Energy and Yoga (76-81)
Section IVThe Eight-Fold Path of Meditation (103-106)
TuesdaySection I 1.2Guided Meditations (16-30)
Section I 1.6The 10 basic steps of teaching Meditation (73)
Section IIIWorking with Affirmations (96-100)
WednesdaySection I. 1.4Devotion and Music (40-51)
ThursdaySection I 1.3Application (31-39)
Section I 1.6How to Teach Meditation (56-64)

Ananda Meditation Teacher Training Manual Table of Contents

Section I – Teaching Meditation1
1.1— The Basics of Meditation1
Meditation is1
What Meditation is NOT2
Why Meditate?3
The Essence of Joy4
Getting Comfortable for a Seated Meditation5
Practical Hints for Meditation8
The Hong-Sau Technique9
How to Meditate with the Hong-Sau Technique9
Preparation: Relaxation9
The Hong-Sau Technique: Concentration 10
Meditation: Expansion10
Enhancing Mantra (Hong-Sau) Meditation Practices11
Benefits of Meditation11
Goals of Meditation12
Why Hong-Sau Works13
1.2 Guided Meditations16
Guided Meditations on the Eight Aspects of God21
Walking Meditations29
1.3 Application31
Bringing Meditation Into Daily Life31
The Importance of Good Company (“Satsang”)32
Meditation Questionnaire — Taking it Home With You34
Obstacles to Meditation34
Signs of Spiritual Progress36
How to Take Seclusion 38
A Sample Day of Seclusion39
1.4 Devotion and Music40
The Devotion aspect of meditation40
Developing Devotion 42
Devotion—Guided Introspection44
Intuitive Guidance 45
What is Chanting? 46
1.5 Guided Prayers52
Effective Prayer52ii
Paramhansa Yogananda’s Healing Prayer Procedures53
Sample Prayers54
1.6 How to Teach Meditation56
How to Be an Inspiring Teacher56
How to Prepare for a Class/Lecture/Workshop58
Suggestions On How to Teach Meditation60
Overcoming Nervousness and Stage Fright63
For Nervousness in General 63
Questions Often Asked About Meditation65
Suggestions for a Four-Week “How to Meditate” Class Series68
Teaching Meditation & Stress Management in the Corporate World71
The 10 Basics Steps of Teaching Meditation73
A Short Version for Teaching Meditation73
‘The Art of Counseling”74
Section II – Physical Aids to Meditation76
2.1—Energy and Yoga 76
Basic Principles of The Energization Exercises 76
How To Teach or Lead Energization77
What Is Breath? 78
Pranayama (Breathing Exercises)81
The Circle of Joy Breath 83
The 6 “Superconscious Living” Exercises84
Seated Yoga Stretches Before Meditation85
Section III – Working with Consciousness86
3.1—Levels of Consciousness86
Different States of Consciousness86
Levels of Consciousness 87
Introspection and Journal Writing Suggestions90
Spiritual Introspection Questions92
Kundalini Power and How to Work With It93
Goal(s) and Benefits of Meditation96
Working with Affirmations96
How to Guide Affirmations and Visualizations98
Samadhi (poem by Paramhansa Yogananda)101
Section IV – Tools of Yoga and Meditation103
4.1—The Eight-Fold Path of Meditation103
Patanjali’s Ashtanga Yoga103
Yama (Control Or Moral Restraint)103iii
Niyama (Non-Control Or Moral Requirement)104
Asana (Posture)104
Applying The Attitudes Of Patanjali’s Yamas & Niyamas To Meditation106
Creating The Habit Of Meditation107
Meditation Habit Changing Worksheet108
Sadhana Chart (Sample)109
The Different Paths Of Yoga — and — What Is Yoga?110
Taking It Home With You112
Suggested Books And CDs113
What is a Yuga?114
Section V – Healing and Meditation117
Dealing with Stress117
Twenty One Effective Ways of Dealing with Stress118
Dealing with the Dark Forces119
Six–Point Plan for Perfect Health122
Healing for The Spirit123
Living a Balanced Life124
Section VI – Research on Meditation127
6.1 Research on Stress and Meditation127
The High Cost of Stress127
Effectiveness of Meditation in Reducing Stress128
Engineered for Divinity — “The Brain” by Peter van Houten, M.D.132
Meditation and Emotions: Their Impact on Your Brain and Health137
Section VII – Marketing Your Classes142
Marketing Your Classes142
Marketing Tools for the Meditation Teacher144
Sources for Various Meditation Props and Gear145
Section VIII 146
8.1—Secrets of Meditation146
8.2—Secrets of Inner Peace149
8.3—Meditation for Starters150

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1 Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga
tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings
from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya,Yoga,Tantra, and Ayurveda.
Examples of concepts and models from the above teachings and philosophy
relevant to yoga therapy, include but are not limited to,
a. tanmatra/bhuta/indriya (subtle element/gross elements/senses);
b. purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
c. pancamaya kosha (dimensions of the human system);
e. duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on the structure, states, functioning, and conditions of the mind, including, but not limited to,
1.2.1.1 drashtr (seer), drshya (seen);
1.2.1.2 antahkarana citta (consciousness), buddhi (intellect), ahamkara (ego), manas (mind);
1.2.1.3 citta vrtti (activities of the mind), citta parinama (structural changes in the mind), vyutthana/nirodha (mind's potential for distraction and focus);
1.2.1.4 artha (cognition), bhava (mood), svabhava (inborn nature), vasana (residue of experience), samskara (conditioned pattern of thinking and behavior); and
1.2.1.5 states of mind: mudha (stupefied/dull), kshipta (disturbed), vikshipta (alternating between distraction and focus), ekagrata (one-pointed), nirodha (focus enveloped/held/ restrained), vaishvanara (waking), taijasa (dream), prajña (deep sleep), turiya (beyond).

1.2.2 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on distracted/disturbed conditions of mind and their expressions as expressed in such texts as the Yoga Sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, and other texts, including but not limited to,
1.2.2.1 klesha (affliction);
1.2.2.2 lobha, krodha, and moha (greed, anger, attachment);
1.2.2.3 duhkha and daurmanasya (suffering/discomfort and negative attitude/thinking), sarupyam (identification with the contents of the mind or seer taking the same form as the mind); and
1.2.2.4 antaraya (obstacles to progress in yoga).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of
the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.1 Basic knowledge of commonly occurring mental health conditions— from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions—their symptoms, and common approaches/interventions, as they relate to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.3.2 Basic knowledge of psychological concepts and terminology, including mood,
cognition, behavior, and personality, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
2.4.1 Familiarity with models of human development, including developmental stages, lifecycles, and personality, and their importance to medical and psychological health and well-being.
2.4.2 Familiarity with the influence of familial, social, cultural, and religious
conditioning on mental and medical perspectives of health and healing.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions
in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.1 In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1 asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation),
3.1.2.4 vihara (lifestyle modifications) including basic yogic dietary concepts.
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.2. Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills: listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.
3.2.4. In-depth Knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.

Category 3.3. Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.4. Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1. Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1 In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.2 In-depth knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles of health care codes of conduct and yoga’s ethical principles.
5.1.3 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles and related concepts from the yoga tradition to professional interactions and relationships.
5.1.4 In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy, resulting in the demonstrated ability to discern the need for referral to other modalities.
5.1.5 Knowledge of the extent of one's own individual training, skills, and evolving experience in yoga therapy, and knowledge of the importance of practicing within such parameters.

Category 5.2. Legal, Regulatory, and Business Issues Pertaining to Yoga Therapy
5.2.2 Basic knowledge of business practices relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including record keeping, planning, and financial management.

Category 5.4. Personal and Professional Development and Continuing Education
5.4.1 Knowledge of the fundamental value of ongoing personal practice, long-term mentorship, and skills maintenance/development through continuing education.
5.4.2 Knowledge of when and how to seek advice and support for case consultation, educational advancement, and personal practice.

Course Completion Requirements

Students have demonstrated understanding of course learning objectives by their supervised practicum, attendance at all lectures, participation in practice teaching & team-teaching sessions, and completion of 4 short talks during the program. In addition, the completion of reading assignments and the final written exam are required.


SYLLABUS
Advanced Pranayama

Course Hours: Total = 43 (Residential)

Prerequisite

Graduate of Ananda Yoga Teacher Training (200-hour), or
Graduate of a Yoga Alliance approved 200-hour Yoga Teacher Training,
Or Ananda Kriya Yoga initiate.

Teaching Format

This is a 7-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, and experiential pranayama/asana workshops and teaching practicums.

Course Description

Pranayama is the key to a deep experience of yoga postures and meditation. In this course students will learn the anatomy and physiology of breath on the physical and subtle levels and how to teach advanced pranayama or energy control techniques, bandhas, mudras, and Yogananda's unique contribution to the science of yoga: Energization Exercises. We will go deeper into understanding how the astral body, especially the chakras, relate to energy control

Faculty: Ananda Ministers + Certified Meditation Teachers

Nayaswami Gyandev McCord, PhD, E-RYT 500, Director of Ananda Yoga TeacherTraining,,Kriyacharya
Nayaswami Diksha McCord, BSc, BFA, Level 2 Ananda Yoga Teacher, Director of Ananda Meditation Teacher Training

Required Texts/Reading Materials

Advanced Pranayama Training Manual. Gyandev McCord

Learning Objectives

At the completion of the course, students will know:

  • Anatomy and physiology of breath
  • How to teach pranayama;
  • How to help students correct a range of breathing abnormalities
  • How to integrate asana, pranayama, and meditation;
  • The subtler aspects of the chakras;
  • How to use the chakra energies to enhance your sadhana;
  • How to awaken and raise kundalini energy;
  • How knowledge of the subtle body aids understanding of karma and reincarnation;
  • How to go deeper into the practice of Yogananda’s Energization Exercises.

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.2 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on distracted/disturbed conditions of mind and their expressions as expressed in such texts as the Yoga Sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, and other texts, including but not limited to,
1.2.2.1. klesha (affliction);
1.2.2.2. lobha, krodha, and moha (greed, anger, attachment);
1.2.2.3 duhkha and daurmanasya (suffering/discomfort and negative attitude/thinking), sarupyam (identification with the contents of the mind or seer taking the same form as the mind); and
1.2.2.4. antaraya (obstacles to progress in yoga).

Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Disease
1.3.1 Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy, including the concepts of
1.3.1.2. subtle anatomy;
1.3.1.8. prana vayu (prana, apana, vyana, udana,samana);
1.3.1.10. surya/chandra (sun/moon);

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.2 Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3 Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.2 Basic knowledge of psychological concepts and terminology, including mood, cognition, behavior, and personality, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.1 In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1 asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation), and ritualized activities such as nyasa and mudra; and
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.4 Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1 Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.

Section 5 Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.

Course Completion Requirements

Students have demonstrated understanding of course learning objectives by their supervised practicum, attendance at all lectures, participation in all discussions and workshops. Completion of required reading. Demonstrate ability to teach Energization satisfactorily and completely via a live practicum.


SYLLABUS
Ananda Spiritual Counseling® Training

Course Contact Hours: Total 24 (Residential)

Prerequisite

Students must complete Meditation Teacher Training Level 1 if their goal is to receive a Meditation Teacher Training level 2 certification. This training can also be taken by people who have not taken MTT level 1, who are not looking for a level 2 certification, in which there is no prerequisite.

Teaching Format

This is a 5-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, experiential, practice teaching, and student teaching and practicum.

Course Description

This one-week program includes specialized exercises, introspection, practice counseling, and instructor feedback. Part of the training is focused on learning about oneself-- strengths and weaknesses, and one’s reactions to different situations. When students counsel others, they can remain even-minded and neutral because of the self-introspection they gave to their own lives.
Students deepen their knowledge and understanding of how to counsel others effectively and to help bring out their students’ divine nature. The aspect of faith and trust in a higher power is also being presented and discussed, to help the students re-evaluate their own belief system and clarify their own relationship with the divine. All the awareness and skills developed during this course will enable the yoga therapist to function more effectively and sensitively.

Faculty: Ananda Ministers

Nayaswami Diksha McCord, BSc, BA, Level 2 Ananda Yoga & Meditation Teacher
Nayaswami Anandi Cornell, BA, Kriyacharya, Level 2 Ananda Meditation Teacher
Nayaswami Mangala Loper-Powers, RN, MN, NP, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT

Required Texts/Reading Materials

Students must also read the Spiritual Counseling Training Manual, which is included in the course.

Reading Assignments

  • Spiritual Counseling Training Manual Table of Contents

    Part 1. Intuition
    Part 2. Principles of Spiritual Counseling
    Part 3. Listening and Asking Questions
    Part 4. Level of Consciousness
    Part 5. Dealing with Illness and Death
    Part 6. The Power of Faith

  • Included in the course materials is: Walters, J. Donald., and Devi Novak. Intuition for Starters: How to Know and Trust Your Inner Guidance. Nevada City, CA: Crystal Clarity, 2002. Print. It is not required, but is often referenced.
  • Students must also watch a 2 hr DVD, The Art of Spiritual Counseling with Swami Kriyananda. 2013 Hansa Trust, www.crystalclarity.org (This is homework and does not count for course hours)

Learning Objectives

Spiritual counseling is an art, and yet there are tools that can be learned and techniques one can practice. Students will learn how to develop their own intuitive abilities so that they can listen to others in the right way. What are their underlying feelings? What questions can you ask to help lead them to their own solutions?

During this course, students will learn how to:

  • Cultivate and recognize true intuition
  • Listen to, and assess, one’s intuitive feelings
  • Listen to someone’s higher self from their own higher self
  • Avoid the temptation to try and “fix” people
  • Look for solutions, instead of being overwhelmed by the problem
  • Recognize subconscious, conscious, and superconscious thinking in themselves and others.
  • Learn how to ask the questions that will open doorways for the
    other person.
  • Evaluate one’s own belief system and your relationship with the divine. Watch for your biases and prejudiced ways of thinking
  • Find solutions for one’s own challenges, through attuning to higher consciousness, and through meditation.

Subject Matter/IAYTCompetencies Covered

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1 Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya, Yoga, Tantra, and Ayurveda. Examples of concepts and models from the above teachings and philosophy relevant to yoga therapy, include but are not limited to,
a. tanmatra/bhuta/indriya (subtle element/gross elements/senses);
b. purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
c. pancamaya kosha (dimensions of the human system);
e. duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on the structure, states, functioning, and conditions of the mind, including, but not limited to,
1.2.1.1 drashtr (seer), drshya (seen);
1.2.1.2 antahkarana citta (consciousness), buddhi (intellect), ahamkara (ego), manas (mind);
1.2.1.3 citta vrtti (activities of the mind), citta parinama (structural changes in the mind), vyutthana/nirodha (mind's potential for distraction and focus);
1.2.1.4 artha (cognition), bhava (mood), svabhava (inborn nature), vasana (residue of experience), samskara (conditioned pattern of thinking and behavior); and
1.2.1.5 states of mind: mudha (stupefied/dull), kshipta (disturbed), vikshipta (alternating between distraction and focus), ekagrata (one-pointed), nirodha (focus enveloped/held/ restrained), vaishvanara (waking), taijasa (dream), prajña (deep sleep), turiya (beyond).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.2 Basic knowledge of psychological concepts and terminology, including mood, cognition, behavior, and personality, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
2.4.1 Familiarity with models of human development, including developmental stages, lifecycles, and personality, and their importance to medical and psychological health and well-being.
2.4.2 Familiarity with the influence of familial, social, cultural, and religious conditioning on mental and medical perspectives of health and healing.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1 asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation),

Category 3.2. Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills: listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.
3.2.4. In-depth Knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.

Category 3.3. Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1 In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.3 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles and related concepts from the yoga tradition to professional interactions and relationships.
5.1.5 Knowledge of the extent of one's own individual training, skills, and evolving experience in yoga therapy, and knowledge of the importance of practicing within such parameters.

Category 5.4. Personal and Professional Development and Continuing Education
5.4.1 Knowledge of the fundamental value of ongoing personal practice, long-term mentorship, and skills maintenance/development through continuing education.
5.4.2 Knowledge of when and how to seek advice and support for case consultation, educational advancement, and personal practice.

Course Completion Requirements

Students have demonstrated understanding of course learning objectives by their supervised practicum, attendance at all lectures, participation in practice teaching sessions, and all workshops. In addition, the completion of reading the Spiritual Counseling manual and completing the homework assignment (Introspection Exercise—done during the course) is required.


SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Teacher Training Assistantship

Course Contact Hours: 76 (Residential)

Prerequisite

80 hours of teaching experience after completing
Ananda Yoga® Teacher Training (200-hour), or RYT-200, or equivalent who has taken
Bridge to Ananda Yoga and then has taught a minimum 30 hours of Ananda Yoga.

Teaching Format

This is a 13-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, and hands on practice assisting and adjusting practicums.

Course Description

Participants will get personal coaching in adapting poses for individual needs, plus hands-on experience as a therapeutic assistant. Students attend daily assisting classes and then practice what they learn with new Yoga Teacher trainees during morning asana classes, practice teaching sessions and restorative yoga sessions. We review anatomy and physiology and common injuries and vulnerabilities that require special consideration when keeping a student safe and comfortable in asanas. Class size is limited to make sure each participant has plenty of hands on experience with real students and personalized feedback by the instructors. This course is a foundation for the skills needed to function effectively as a yoga therapist.

Faculty: Certified Meditation Teachers

Maitri Jones RN, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT, Ananda Minister
Melody Hansen, E-RYT-500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT
Michele Tsihlas, E-RYT 200, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT, Certified Personal Trainer

Required Texts/Reading Materials

Ananda Yoga Assistantship Manual .The Expanding Light, 2018
Ananda Yoga Teacher Training Manual. The Expanding Light, 2018

Learning Objectives

At the completion of the course students will know:

  • How to recognize misalignment in a wide variety of yoga asanas
  • How to keep yoga students safe and prevent potential injury in yoga practice
  • How and why modify yoga poses for specific health conditions
  • How to use verbal, visual and touch assistance to adjust students in yoga poses
  • Appropriate and effective touch techniques
  • How to help students understand their own body mechanics and learn to self adjust
  • How to use props to enhance safety and depth of experience in the poses.
  • Methods to help students learn experience more physical and energy depth in asanas
  • How to create a therapeutic rapport between teacher and student

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered:

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1 Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya,Yoga,Tantra, and Ayurveda. Examples of concepts and models from the above teachings and philosophy relevant to yoga therapy, include but are not limited to,
a. tanmatra/bhuta/indriya (subtle element/gross elements/senses);
b. purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
c. pancamaya kosha (dimensions of the human system);
e. duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on the structure, states, functioning, and conditions of the mind, including, but not limited to,
1.2.1.1 drashtr (seer), drshya (seen);
1.2.1.2 antahkarana citta (consciousness), buddhi (intellect), ahamkara (ego), manas (mind);
1.2.1.5 states of mind:mudha (stupefied/dull), kshipta (disturbed), vikshipta (alternating between distraction and focus), ekagrata (one-pointed), nirodha (focus enveloped/held/ restrained), vaishvanara (waking), taijasa (dream), prajña (deep sleep), turiya (beyond).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology

2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.2 Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3 Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.1 Familiarity with commonly used drugs and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.2.2 Familiarity with common medical terminology.
2.2.3 Knowledge of how to reference current healthcare information relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including pathologies, disorders, drugs,

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1 asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.

Category 3.2. Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills: listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.

Category 3.3. Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.4. Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.2. In-depth knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles of health care codes of conduct and yoga's ethical principles.

Category 5.4. Personal and Professional Development and Continuing Education
5.4.1 Knowledge of the fundamental value of ongoing personal practice, long-term mentorship, and skills maintenance/development through continuing education.
5.4.2 Knowledge of when and how to seek advice and support for case consultation, educational advancement, and personal practice.

Course Completion Requirements

Students have demonstrated understanding of course learning objectives by their supervised practicum, attendance at all classes, participation in all discussions and workshops. Completion of required reading. Understanding of assisting principles and techniques as demonstrated in hands on practicums and review sessions.


SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Principles

Course Hours: Total = 74 (Residential and Distance)

  • Residential = 42 (with 6 hours Practicum)
  • Distance = 32 (as Home Practicum)
  • Practicum = 38 (6 hours Residential; 32 Distance)

Prerequisite

Graduate of Ananda Yoga Teacher Training, and one year of personal practice and one year of experience teaching Ananda Yoga (minimum of 80 hours).
OR, graduate of a RYS-200 program, who has taken Bridge to Ananda Yoga and has taught 30 hours of Ananda Yoga. Must also have a year’s personal practice, and have completed an Application for Ananda Yoga Therapy Training.

Teaching Format

This is a 7-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, case studies and practicum (both distance and residential).

Course Description

This in-depth 7-day program is the first module of Ananda’s Yoga Therapy Training. It provides many practical foundational skills necessary for a safe and effective yoga therapy practice including assessment skills from the perspective of structure and function, posture alignment, breath, subtle energy, chakras, Ayurvedic Assessment of Prakruti, Vikruti, Gunas. Intuition and energy healing are presented as essential skills for yoga therapists to cultivate. Therapeutic relationships are discussed as well as practiced by working with volunteer clients in class and at home with faculty supervision. Documentation skills are learned and practiced as well as the basics of business aspects of becoming a yoga therapist. This program is the foundation for all of our other yoga therapy programs.

Faculty: Ananda Yoga Ministers and Meditation Teachers:

Mangala Loper-Powers RN, MN, NP, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT
Maitri Jones, RN, BSN, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT
Barbara Bingham, RPT, BS, CYT, Ananda Yoga Therapist
Shanti Rubenstone, MD, Ananda Minister, Teacher & Lecturer,Kriyacharya

Required Texts/Reading Materials & Reading Assignments

  • McCall, Timothy B. Yoga as Medicine: The Yogic Prescription for Health & Healing. New York: Bantam, 2012. Print. Chapters 1 & 2, and Afterword (p.493-6)
  • Lasater, Judith. Yogabody: Anatomy, Kinesiology, and Asana. Berkeley, CA: Rodmell, 2009
  • Simpson, Savitri Chakras Workbook, (2012, Savitri Simpson, self-published) p. 11 – 28 and 40-45.
  • Walters, J. Donald., and Devi Novak. Intuition for Starters: How to Know and Trust Your Inner Guidance. Nevada City, CA: Crystal Clarity, 2002. Print.
  • Ch. 1 & 2 (pp. 13-43) Ch. 6 pp. 101 to top of 108
  • Ayurveda pamphlet, Ayurveda: A Brief Introduction and Guide, (2006, The Ayurvedic Press) (pamphlet will be given to you when you arrive), p. 1 to top of p. 3
  • Yogananda. Scientific Healing Affirmations: Theory and Practice of Concentration. Los Angeles: Self-Realization Fellowship, 2012. Print. Chapters 1 – 4 (pp. 3 – 34)
  • Yogananda. Divine Will Healing Excerpts (currently out of print) (handout in section 5 of manual)
  • Walters, J. Donald. Affirmations for Self-healing. Nevada City, CA: Crystal Clarity, 2005. pp.13-18.
  • Yogananda. How to Achieve Glowing Health and Vitality. Nevada City, CA: Crystal Clarity, 2011. Ch.1-Vitalize the Body, pp.9-20; 30-37. Ch.2-All-Round Health, pp.39-49. Ch.7-God’s Healing Power, pp.117-129.
  • Ananda Yoga Therapy Training Manual: Principles, read all.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the course, students will:

  • Demonstrate practical client assessment skills (including structural and functional assessment, chakra assessment, basic Ayurvedic constitution and imbalances assessment)
  • Demonstrate ability to take a client history, create, document, and evaluate individualized therapeutic plans
  • Demonstrate a deeper understanding of anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology
  • Learn how to design individualized yoga therapy regimes
  • Demonstrate understanding of how chakra energy affects client's physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well being and how this knowledge can inform the choice of techniques used in yoga therapy routines.
  • Know how Yoga and Ayurveda work together to promote well-being of body, mind, and spirit.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the breadth of Yoga teachings (asanas, meditation, pranayama, diet, yoga philosophy, and more), and how they can be used to help a client therapeutically.
  • Know the principles Energy Healing and demonstrate how to send healing energy to others; the roles of prayer and intention;
  • Demonstrate understanding of the importance of the power of the mind; the use of affirmations, visualizations, and mantra.
  • Be familiar with important issues in conducting the business of yoga therapy, how to communicate with health care professionals and how to generate and interpret referral information.
  • Understand how to establish therapeutic relationships with clients, how to set clear boundaries; what are professional and ethical boundaries; listening and communication skills.

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1 Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya, Yoga, Tantra, and Ayurveda.
Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on the structure, states, functioning, and conditions of the mind, including, but not limited to, citta vrtti (activities of the mind), citta parinama (structural changes in the mind), vyutthana/nirodha (mind's potential for distraction and focus)
Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Disease
1.3.1 Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy.
1.3.1.3 Tri-dosha (effects of the elements on the physical body);
1.3.1.5 prakrti/vikrti (dosha constitution at birth/imbalance of the dosha currently expressed in the body);
1.3.2 Knowledge of categorizing illness

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.2 Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3 Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.2 Familiarity with common medical terminology.
2.2.3 Knowledge of how to reference current healthcare information relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including pathologies, disorders, drugs,and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions. Practices may include, but are not limited to,.
3.1.2.1 Asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 Pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 Meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation), and ritualized activities such as nyasa and mudra; and
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.2 Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills: listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.

Category 3.3 Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.4. In-depth Knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Section 4. Practicum

Category 4.1 Providing Yoga Therapy
4.1.1 Demonstrated ability to conduct intake and assess the client/student, including
4.1.1.1 Taking a history of the client and his/her condition(s); and
4.1.1.2 Assessing the current condition using the tools relevant to the yoga therapist, including an evaluation of the physical, energetic, mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of well-being.
4.1.2. Demonstrated ability to elicit the goals, expectations, and aspirations of the client/student.
4.1.3. Demonstrated ability to integrate information from the intake, evaluation, and observation to develop a working assessment of the client's condition, limitations, and possibilities.
4.1.4. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.5. Demonstrated ability to identify priorities and set both long- and short-term goals with the client/student.
4.1.6. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of pacification, purification, and strengthening strategies.
4.1.7. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of strategies that address common disorders and pathologies of the major human systems and common mental health conditions, as well as other goals and aspirations of the student as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
4.1.8. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9. Demonstrated knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10. Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11. Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice.
4.1.12. Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships.
4.1.13. Demonstrated ability to provide follow up and re-planning.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1 Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.2. In-depth knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles of health care codes of conduct and yoga's ethical principles.
5.1.3. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles and related concepts from the yoga tHHition to professional interactions and relationships.
5.1.4. In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy, resulting in the demonstrated ability to discern the need for referral to other modalities.
5.1.5. Knowledge of the extent of one's own individual training, skills, and evolving experience in yoga therapy, and knowledge of the importance of practicing within such parameters

Category 5.2. Legal, Regulatory, and Business Issues Pertaining to Yoga Therapy
5.2.1. Knowledge of current relevant local, state, and national laws and regulations impacting the work of a yoga therapist.
5.2.2. Basic knowledge of business practices relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including record keeping, planning, and financial management.

Category 5.3. Relationships with Peers, Mentors, Clinicians, and Organizations
5.3.2. Basic knowledge of how to establish, maintain, and utilize a referral network of peers and related healthcare practitioners and organizations.
5.3.3. Basic knowledge of how to develop and maintain ongoing collaborative relationships.

Category 5.4. Personal and Professional Development and Continuing Education
5.4.1. Knowledge of the fundamental value of ongoing personal practice, long-term mentorship, and skills maintenance/development through continuing education.
5.4.2. Knowledge of when and how to seek advice and support for case consultation, educational advancement, and personal practice

Course Completion Requirements

  • Attendance at all classes.
  • Completion of all assigned readings.
  • Participation in class discussions and activities (including case studies, review sessions, practicums). Participation needs to reflect that the student has learned and begun to assimilate the information from their assigned readings. (The faculty will be assessing whether the student has achieved the level of knowledge and appropriate application of that knowledge according to the IAYT Competencies that apply.)
  • Satisfactory performance (80%) on in-class (closed-book) Quizzes. This will indicate an achievement of the stated course Learning Objectives. Students will be given Answer Keys to the Quizzes immediately after taking them, and there will then be time for further Q & A and group discussion with faculty.
  • During in-class practicums, students must provide yoga therapy interventions in a safe and appropriate manner, in accordance with the IAYT Competencies for providing yoga therapy (Section 4, Category 4.1), as determined by supervising faculty. Students are given immediate feedback from faculty and peers on all aspects of their observational, assessment, decision-making, planning, teaching and record-keeping skills.
  • Satisfactory completion of the Home Practice Assignment. Students are given written feedback by supervising faculty, along with an offer to speak in person or by phone in addition. If the expected standard of satisfactory performance (set by IAYT Standards and Competencies) is not met, then students will be given additional guidance and assignments as needed until they can demonstrate the expected competency.
  • If any of the above requirements or expectations are not met, the student will be counseled and/or given additional assignments in order to help them be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance.


SYLLABUS
Restorative Ananda Yoga® Teacher Training

Course Hours: Total = 30 (Residential and Distance)

  • Residential: 22 (with 5 hours Practicum)
  • Distance: 8 (as Home Practicum)
  • Practicum: 13 (5 Residential; 8 Distance)

Prerequisite

Graduate of Ananda Yoga® Teacher Training (200-hour), or
Graduate of a Yoga Alliance approved 200-hour Yoga Teacher Training

Teaching Format

This is a 3-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, experiential, practice teaching of restorative yoga asanas for individuals and small groups, and student teaching and practicum (residential). Students also complete a home practicum assignment.

Faculty

Melody Hansen, E-RYT-500, Certified Ananda Yoga Teacher 200 & 500, Certified Meditation Teacher, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT

Required Texts/Reading Materials

Reading assignments (sections 1 – 7) from the Restorative Yoga Teacher Training manual, which includes fully illustrated photos of the asanas and their props by Barbara Bingham, instructions and guidelines for: teaching, assisting and adjusting students in the asanas, cautions/contraindications and modifications for asanas, plus handouts written by Ananda Faculty, articles, research papers, excerpts from the Ananda YTT 200 manual, and other resources. This manual is included with the course.

Course Description

On two evenings of the course we have the students teach a yoga therapy restorative yoga class to a large group of volunteer clients, and to individualized clients. Both these sessions are supervised under senior faculty observation, and require students to present a pose to the entire group while catering to the individual needs of their private client. Each student is evaluated by the instructors and given written feedback on how to improve in their teaching skills for the next class and in general. The following day, students are given time to share their experiences and discuss their cases and the course of actions they took in order to improve their client’s experience. On the final day, there is a quiz that is graded in class so both students and faculty know what needs to be reviewed or expanded upon.

Though this course focus is on restorative yoga, other areas of study and of yoga therapy (such as Pranayama, Chakras, Chanting, and meditation) are brought into the discussion, instruction and practice.
Common cautions and contraindications and/or injuries are covered as related to each restorative asana. Students will participate in and be assigned one or more student/clients to work with for two 2 hour sessions under supervision of senior faculty. Students will prepare and give a presentation of two different asanas and how to modify props to meet individual needs, and then practice assisting and adjusting with their client.

Learning Objectives

At the completion of the course, students will know:

  • How to be a safe, supportive, and conscientious Restorative Yoga Teacher
  • How to sequence an Ananda Yoga Restorative Routine in a therapeutic way that enhances the well-being of the practitioner on all levels and follows the ultimate aim of the ancient science of Raja Yoga
  • How to teach 2 coherent Ananda Yoga Restorative Routines (with appropriate modifications as needed by individuals) including the guidance and instruction of: Breathing, Posture, Proper Alignment, Safety mechanics for asanas and the common cautions and contraindications
  • How to demonstrate restorative yoga asanas and their common modifications and variations needed for students with or without special conditions
  • How to explain the common conditions/cautions and/or complaints a student may experience in a restorative pose and know how to individually assist these students in the asanas so that they are practicing safely and comfortably
  • How to use the breath to invoke the Relaxation Response
  • How to practice with a variety of props you will actually be using in real-life situations
  • How to experience and student-teach restorative poses that focus on releasing specific physical and mental tensions
  • How to use affirmations, visualizations, meditation, and music to deepen your own and your students’ practice of Restorative Yoga
  • How to work one-on-one with 2 or more yoga clients who need individual assistance and modifications

Course Completion Requirements:

Students have demonstrated understanding of course learning objectives by their supervised practicum, attendance at all lectures, participation in practice teaching & team-teaching sessions, and all asana workshops. In addition, the completion of reading assignments (Sections 1 – 7) in the restorative teacher training manual, and satisfactory performance on the final quiz (80%), are required.

PLEASE NOTE—The following information pertains ONLY to those who are taking this course as part of Ananda Yoga Therapy Training:

Satisfactory completion of Home Practice Assignment is also required for those enrolled in the Ananda Yoga Therapy Training program.

  • Students are given written feedback by supervising faculty, along with an offer to speak in person or by phone in addition. If the expected standard of satisfactory performance (set by IAYT Standards and Competencies) is not met, then students will be given additional guidance and assignments as needed until they can demonstrate the expected competency.
  • If any of the above requirements or expectations are not met, the student will be counseled and/or given additional assignments in order to help them be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance.

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered:

The main focus of this course covers the broad categories of 2.5 Body and Mind Integration, 3.1 Basic Principles of Therapeutic Relationship, 3.2 Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students, 3.3 Principles and Skills for Working in Groups, 4.0 Yoga Therapy Tools, 4.1 Yoga Practices and their Application and Practicum in the restorative yoga context. Below are the competencies covered:

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.2. Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3. Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications,
as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.2. Familiarity with common medical terminology.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
2.4.2. Familiarity with the influence of familial, social, cultural, and religious conditioning on mental and medical perspectives of health and healing.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1. Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.1. In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama in the context of yoga therapy.
3.1.2. In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1. Asana (postures);
3.1.2.2. Pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3. Meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation),
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.2. Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills: listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue..
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.

Category 3.3. Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.4. Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1 Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 4. Practicum

Category 4.1. Provide Yoga Therapy
4.1.1 Demonstrated ability to conduct intake and assess the client/student, including
4.1.1.1. Taking a history of the client and his/her condition(s); and
4.1.1.2. Assessing the current condition using the tools relevant to the yoga therapist, including an evaluation of the physical, energetic, mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of well-being.
4.1.2. Demonstrated ability to elicit the goals, expectations, and aspirations of the client/student.
4.1.3. Demonstrated ability to integrate information from the intake, evaluation, and observation to develop a working assessment of the client's condition, limitations, and possibilities.
4.1.4. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.8. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9. Demonstrated knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10. Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11. Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice, including
4.1.11.1. Providing instruction, demonstration, education of the client/student using multimodal strategies of education such as auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learning tools; and
4.1.11.2. Providing supportive strategies for the client/student to actively participate in his/her practice, such as a means to remember his/her practice (e.g., auditory and visual tools).
4.1.12. Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships including
4.2.12.1. Fostering trust by establishing an appropriate therapeutic environment through privacy, confidentiality, and safety; and
4.1.12.2. Practicing effective, client/student-centered communication based upon a respect for, and sensitivity to, individual, familial, cultural, social, ethnic, and religious factors.
4.1.13.1. Gathering feedback, re-assess, and refine the practice and to determine short-term and long-term goals and priorities;
4.1.13.2. Addressing new and changing conditions, goals, aspirations, and priorities of the student/client and to provide appropriate support; and
4.1.13.3. Providing appropriate closure for the therapy sessions.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1 In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.2 In-depth knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles of health care codes of conduct and yoga’s ethical principles.


SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Seniors & Bone Strength

Course Hours: Total = 32 (Residential and Distance)

  • Residential = 22
  • Distance = 10 (as Home Practicum)
  • Practicum = 10 (Distance, as Home Practicum)

Prerequisite

Graduate of Ananda Yoga® Teacher Training (200-hour), or
Graduate of a Yoga Alliance approved 200-hour Yoga Teacher Training

Teaching Format

This is a 3–day course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, and case studies (with students working together in teams), and an opportunity for small groups of students to provide components of a sample yoga therapy session for clients. There is also a Home Practicum Assignment.

Faculty

Maitri Jones, BSN, RN, E-RYT-500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT
Barbara Bingham, BS, RPT, CYT, Ananda Yoga Therapist
Mangala Loper-Powers RN, MN, NP, E-RYT-500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT

Required Texts/Reading Assignments

  • Ananda Yoga Therapy for Seniors and Bone Strength Manual. The Expanding Light, 2018.—Read the whole Manual.

Recommended Resources

  • Fishman, Loren, and Ellen Saltonstall. Yoga for Osteoporosis: The Complete Guide. New York: W. W. Norton &, 2010.
  • Meeks, Sara. Walk Tall!: An Exercise Program for the Prevention & Treatment of Back Pain, Osteoporosis and the Postural Changes of Aging. Gainesville, FL: Triad Pub., 2010.
  • Additional recommended resources are included in the Course Manual.

Course Description

This course gives an overview of the physiological and psychological changes that commonly occur in seniors (65 years and older), and how the yoga therapist can help clients to optimize function and emphasize the positive aspects of gracefully moving into this stage of life.

Since more and more people over age 50 are being diagnosed with osteoporosis or osteopenia, these conditions are also addressed in this course.

Students learn cautions that need to be observed for seniors and for those who are at risk for or who have low bone density, so that they can practice yoga safely, with a special emphasis on posture, yoga asanas, pranayama and general lifestyle factors. Students will also learn and practice a variety of yoga interventions that therapeutically address the need for increased bone density for all who may be at risk for this condition, regardless of their age.

This course covers how to help older people:

  1. Practice yoga postures and pranayama safely
  2. Use yoga asana practice to optimize bone strength
  3. Maintain muscle strength, flexibility, and balance
  4. Embrace a positive attitude about aging

Learning Objectives

At the completion of the course, students will:

  • Gain in depth knowledge about the normal aging process including both physiological and psychological changes, as they relate to addressing these needs in their yoga therapy practice.
  • Gain knowledge of Osteoarthritis and the implications for safe practice of yoga postures and daily life activities.
  • Develop knowledge about recent research related to aging and the brain, and apply this knowledge to assist seniors to maximize their brain health.
  • Develop an appreciation for and apply therapies to encourage a dynamic approach to Inspired Aging.
  • Explain how a mature brain has an advantage over a younger brain.
  • Describe environmental considerations in setting up spaces for the practice of yoga postures for seniors.
  • Gain knowledge about Osteoporosis and Osteopenia, Fracture Risk considerations, and Bone Density measurement tests; and be able to apply this knowledge in guiding clients who have or are at risk for low bone density in safe yoga practice and activities of daily living.
  • List the major cautions for those with low bone density in the practice of yoga postures.
  • Explain how posture impacts the density of bones.
  • Demonstrate the ability to teach yoga postures gently and safely to help seniors and those with low bone density to maintain full and active lives.
  • Demonstrate how to help people, even as they age, to build strength, flexibility and balance.
  • Demonstrate the ability to enhance bone density for the otherwise healthy yoga practitioner and for those with low bone density.
  • Gain in depth knowledge and demonstrate the ability to modify asanas for those with osteopenia and osteoporosis, including those who already experience postural and structural changes.
  • Demonstrate the ability to choose appropriate pranayama techniques with modifications for seniors.
  • Create a therapeutic yoga routine for an otherwise healthy student with osteopenia and another for the same kind of client with osteoporosis.
  • Create a therapeutic yoga routine for a frail senior with osteoporosis.

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered:

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1. Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachingsfrom Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya,Yoga,Tantra, and Ayurveda.

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.2. Knowledge of yoga perspectives on distracted/disturbed conditions of mind and their expressions as expressed in such texts as the Yoga Sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, and other texts, including but not limited to,

Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Diseasee
1.3.1. Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy.
1.3.2. Knowledge of categorizing illness.
1.3.2.1. Development/evolution of disease (samprapti [pathogenisis]), including but not limited to direction, intensity, onset, and duration and their influence on the ease or difficulty of healing and disease management.
1.3.2.2. Setting priorities: symptoms/pacification (shamana [short term]) and purification/strengthening (shodhana [long term]).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.1. Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.2. Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3. Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.1. Familiarity with commonly used drugs and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.2.2. Familiarity with common medical terminology.
2.2.3. Knowledge of how to reference current healthcare information relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including pathologies, disorders, drugs, and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.1. Basic knowledge of commonly occurring mental health conditions— from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions—their symptoms, and common approaches/interventions, as they relate to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.3.2. Basic knowledge of psychological concepts and terminology, including mood, cognition, behavior, and personality, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
2.4.1. Familiarity with models of human development, including developmental stages, lifecycles, and personality, and their importance to medical and psychological health and well-being.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1. Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.1. In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama in the context of yoga therapy.
3.1.2.1. Asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 Pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3. Meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation), and ritualized activities such as nyasa and mudra.
3.1.3. In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.2 Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills: listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.

Category 3.3 Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.4 Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1. Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 4. Practicum

Category 4.1 Providing Yoga Therapy
4.1.1. Demonstrated ability to conduct intake and assess the client/student, including
4.1.1.1. Taking a history of the client and his/her condition(s); and
4.1.1.2. Assessing the current condition using the tools relevant to the yoga therapist, including an evaluation of the physical, energetic, mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of well-being.
4.1.2. Demonstrated ability to elicit the goals, expectations, and aspirations of the client/student.
4.1.3. Demonstrated ability to integrate information from the intake, evaluation, and observation to develop a working assessment of the client's condition, limitations, and possibilities.
4.1.4. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.5. Demonstrated ability to identify priorities and set both long- and short-term goals with the client/student.
4.1.6. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of pacification, purification, and strengthening strategies.
4.1.7. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of strategies that address common disorders and pathologies of the major human systems and common mental health conditions, as well as other goals and aspirations of the student as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
4.1.8. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9. Demonstrated knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10. Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11. Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice.
4.1.12. Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships.
4.1.13. Demonstrated ability to provide follow up and re-planning.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.2. In-depth knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles of health care codes of conduct and yoga's ethical principles.
5.1.3. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles and related concepts from the yoga tradition to professional interactions and relationships.
5.1.4. In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy, resulting in the demonstrated ability to discern the need for referral to other modalities.
5.1.5. Knowledge of the extent of one's own individual training, skills, and evolving experience in yoga therapy, and knowledge of the importance of practicing within such parameters.

Category 5.3. Relationships with Peers, Mentors, Clinicians, and Organizations
5.3.1. Basic knowledge of other healthcare fields and their potential role in and relevance to the work of a yoga therapist.

Course Completion Requirements

  • Attendance at all classes.
  • Completion of all assigned readings.
  • Participation in class discussions and activities (including case studies, review sessions, practicums). Participation needs to reflect that the student has learned and begun to assimilate the information from their assigned readings. (The faculty will be assessing whether the student has achieved the level of knowledge and appropriate application of that knowledge according to the IAYT Competencies that apply.)
  • Satisfactory performance on in-class (closed-book) Quizzes (80%). This will indicate an achievement of the stated course Learning Objectives. Students will be given Answer Keys to the Quizzes immediately after taking them, and there will then be time for further Q & A and group discussion with faculty.
  • During in-class practicums, students must provide yoga therapy interventions in a safe and appropriate manner, in accordance with the IAYT Competencies for providing yoga therapy (Section 4, Category 4.1), as determined by supervising faculty. Students are given immediate feedback from faculty and peers on all aspects of their observational, assessment, decision-making, planning, teaching and record-keeping skills.
  • Satisfactory completion of the Home Practice Assignment. Students are given written feedback by supervising faculty, along with an offer to speak in person or by phone in addition. If the expected standard of satisfactory performance (set by IAYT Standards and Competencies) is not met, then students will be given additional guidance and assignments as needed until they can demonstrate the expected competency.
  • If any of the above requirements or expectations are not met, the student will be counseled and/or given additional assignments in order to help them be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance.

SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Musculoskeletal–1

Course Hours: Total = 107 (Residential and Distance)

  • Residential: 73 (with 12 hours Practicum)
  • Distance: 34 (as Home Practice)
  • Practicum: 46 (12 Residential, 34 Distance)

Prerequisite

Enrollment in the Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training program, AND
*Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Principles

Teaching Format

This is a 12-day residential course, which combines lectures, discussion, practice teaching, case-study observation, experiential components, student talks and practicum. There are daily quizzes that are graded in class so both students and faculty know immediately exactly what may need to be reviewed or expanded upon. On the 5th day this course combines with a residential clinic/workshop. Yoga Therapy Students come to work with the Yoga Therapist Trainees under senior faculty observation. Students are matched with a yoga therapist trainee for three days of yoga therapy to include intake, private sessions, small group sessions, and take home program instruction. In between these sessions the yoga therapist trainees meet with their faculty to discuss their cases and plan a course of action and what has taken place already. Though this course focus is on musculoskeletal, other areas of study (such as Ayurveda, chakras, meditation, Bhagavad Gita, spiritual disposition and background, etc,) are brought into the discussion, instruction and practice. This is especially emphasized when working with the observed case studies and practicum component.

Course Description

Review of anatomy and physiology as it relates to the musculoskeletal system and yoga therapy is covered including common pathologies, structural imbalances, functional imbalances etc. Review and practice of intake especially as it relates to musculoskeletal issues, evaluation, decision-making and delivery of yoga therapy interventions.
For Musculoskeletal conditions, "Quick Fixes" (those protocols which work in the majority of cases), Level I Therapeutics (more in-depth) and Maintenance Therapeutics are covered. More severe conditions are discussed but yoga therapy interventions are not gone into in this course as they will be covered in more detail in Yoga Therapy Training: Musculoskeletal 2. Adaptations as needed for daily living are covered for different conditions. Surgery basics are covered, including Total Hip and Knee Replacements. Students will participate in the residential clinic/workshop and be assigned one or more student/clients to work with for three days under supervision of senior faculty. Students will prepare and give a talk as assigned on a musculoskeletal yoga therapy topic.

Faculty

Nicole DeAvilla BA, E-RYT 500, RPYT, RCYT, Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT, primary faculty
Assisting Faculty:
Barbara Bingham, RPT, BS, CYT, Ananda Yoga Therapist Therapist (primary Anatomy & Physiology faculty)
Maitri Jones RN, BSN, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT

Required Texts/Reading Assignments

  • Ananda Yoga Therapy Training: Musculoskeletal-1 Manual, which includes the Ananda Musculoskeletal Workbook, based on the work of Nicole DeAvilla, fully illustrated with drawings and photos by Barbara Bingham (140+ pages), plus handouts written by Ananda Faculty, articles, research papers, and forms for intake, evaluation and other resources. This manual is included in the cost of the course.
  • McCall, Timothy B. Yoga as Medicine: The Yogic Prescription for Health & Healing. New York: Bantam, 2012. Print.
    Chapter 9,11,13,14,17 and Appendix 1
  • Lasater, Judith. Yogabody: Anatomy, Kinesiology, and Asana. Berkeley, CA: Rodmell, 2009. Print.
    Chapter 1&2

Learning Objectives

Students will learn anatomy and physiology as it relates to the practice of yoga therapy. They will have an ability to communicate with other health care providers regarding a mutual client. They will learn root word meanings (such as "-itis" refers to inflammation) and how to research conditions previously unknown to them. They will know when to refer their clients/students to another healthcare provider. They will know their scope of practice. They will have practiced and be able to deliver to yoga therapy clients and students common Ananda protocols, level I therapeutics, maintenance and prevention interventions. They will be able to guide their student/clients in daily living recommendations. They will be able to assess a clients unique needs so that in addition to the more physically based interventions emphasized in this course, they will be able to deliver interventions that work on the emotional, social, mental, spiritual and subtle energy levels as needed. At this stage they will be encouraged to work with their notes and other reference materials and to frequently check in with their mentors on either assigned case studies or other cases and questions that come to them. These objectives are measured by the quizzes, in class demonstrations and their clinic/practicum which is observed by one or more senior faculty at all times. Student/clients of the clinic also give both in-person and confidential feedback of their experience.

Subject Matter/Competencies Covered

The main focus of this course covers the broad categories of 2.1 Anatomy and Physiology, 2.2 Biomedical Knowledge, 2.5 Body and Mind Integration, 3.1 Basic Principles of Therapeutic Relationship, 3.2 Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students, 3.3 Principles and Skills for Working in Groups, 3.0 Yoga Therapy Tools and their Application and Practicum in the musculoskeletal context (Section 4, Category 4.1 Providing Yoga Therapy). Below are additional competencies covered.

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1 Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya, Yoga, Tantra, and Ayurveda. Examples of concepts and models from the above teachings and philosophy relevant to yoga therapy, include but are not limited to,
    a. tanmatra/bhuta/indriya (subtle element/gross elements/senses);
   b. purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
   c. pancamaya kosha (dimensions of the human system);
   d. guna (fundamental forces of nature); and
   e. duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind

1.2.2.3 duhkha and daurmanasya (suffering/discomfort and negative attitude/thinking), sarupyam
(identification with the contents of the mind or seer taking the same form as the mind)

Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Disease
1.3.1 Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy, including the concepts of
1.3.1.1 panca maya (kosha) (fundamental structure of the human system);
1.3.1.2 subtle anatomy;
1.3.1.3 tri-dosha (effect of the elements on the physical body);
1.3.1.4 tri-guna (effect of sattva (equilibrium), rajas (activity), tamas [(inertia]);
1.3.1.5 prakrti/vikrti (dosha constitution at birth/imbalance of the dosha currently expressed in the body);
1.3.1.6 ama (undigested food, emotions, etc. accumulated in the body);
1.3.1.7 agni (internal fire(s) and their contribution to health);
1.3.1.8 prana vayu (prana, apana, vyana, udana,samana);
1.3.1.9 prana prakopa (disturbance of the vayu);
1.3.1.10 surya/chandra (sun/moon);
1.3.1.11 brmhana/langhana (expansion/contraction); and
1.3.1.12 vyuha model: heya (the symptoms), hetu (the causes), hana (the goal), upaya (the tools).
1.3.2 Knowledge of categorizing illness, including
1.3.2.1 Development/evolution of disease (samprapti [pathogenisis], including but not limited to direction, intensity, onset, and duration and their influence on the ease or difficulty of healing and disease management.
1.3.2.2 Setting priorities: symptoms/pacification (shamana [short term]) and purification/strengthening (shodhana [long term]).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.2 Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3 Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.1 Familiarity with commonly used drugs and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.2.2 Familiarity with common medical terminology.
2.2.3 Knowledge of how to reference current healthcare information relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including pathologies, disorders, drugs, and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.3. Additional Knowledge
2.3.1 Basic knowledge of commonly occurring mental health conditions—from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions—their symptoms, and common approaches/interventions, as they relate to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
2.4.1 Familiarity with models of human development, including developmental stages, lifecycles, and personality, and their importance to medical and psychological health and well-being.
2.4.2 Familiarity with the influence of familial, social, cultural, and religious conditioning on mental and medical perspectives of health and healing.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Practices
3.1.1 In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1 Asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 Pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 Meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation), and ritualized activities such as nyasa and mudra; and
3.1.2.4 Vihara (lifestyle modifications) including basic yogic dietary concepts.
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.2. Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills:
listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.
3.2.4. In-depth Knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.

Category 3.3. Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.4. Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1. Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 4. Practicum

Category 4.1. Provide Yoga Therapy
4.1.1. Demonstrated ability to conduct intake and assess the client/student, including
4.1.1.1. Taking a history of the client and his/her condition(s); and
4.1.1.2. Assessing the current condition using the tools relevant to the yoga therapist, including an evaluation of the physical, energetic, mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of well-being.
4.1.2. Demonstrated ability to elicit the goals, expectations, and aspirations of the client/student.
4.1.3. Demonstrated ability to integrate information from the intake, evaluation, and observation to develop a working assessment of the client's condition, limitations, and possibilities.
4.1.4. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.5. Demonstrated ability to identify priorities and set both long- and short-term goals with the client/student.
4.1.6. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of pacification, purification, and strengthening strategies.
4.1.7. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of strategies that address common disorders and pathologies of the major human systems and common mental health conditions, as well as other goals and aspirations of the student as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
4.1.8. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9. Demonstrated knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10. Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11. Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice, including
4.1.11.1. providing instruction, demonstration, education of the client/student using multimodal strategies of education such as auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learning tools; and
4.1.11.2. Providing supportive strategies for the client/student to actively participate in his/her practice, such as a means to remember his/her practice (e.g., auditory and visual tools).
4.1.12. Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships including
4.1.12.1. Fostering trust by establishing an appropriate therapeutic environment through privacy, confidentiality, and safety; and
4.1.12.2. Practicing effective, client/student-centered communication based upon a respect for, and sensitivity to, individual, familial, cultural, social, ethnic, and religious factors.
4.1.13. Demonstrated ability to provide follow up and re-planning, including
4.1.13.1. Gathering feedback, re-assess, and refine the practice and to determine short-term and long-term goals and priorities;
4.1.13.2. Addressing new and changing conditions, goals, aspirations, and priorities of the student/client and to provide appropriate support; and
4.1.13.3. Providing appropriate closure for the therapy sessions.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.2. In-depth knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles of health care codes of conduct and yoga's ethical principles.
5.1.3. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles and related concepts from the yoga tradition to professional interactions and relationships.
5.1.4 In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy, resulting in the demonstrated ability to discern the need for referral to other modalities.
5.1.5. Knowledge of the extent of one's own individual training, skills, and evolving experience in yoga therapy, and knowledge of the importance of practicing within such parameters.

Category 5.2. Legal, Regulatory, and Business Issues Pertaining to Yoga Therapy
5.2.1 Knowledge of current relevant local, state, and national laws and regulations impacting the work of a yoga therapist.
5.2.2 Basic knowledge of business practices relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including record keeping, planning, and financial management.

Category 5.3. Relationships with Peers, Mentors, Clinicians, and
Organizations

5.3.1. Basic knowledge of other healthcare fields and their potential role in and relevance to the work of a yoga therapist.
5.3.2. Basic knowledge of how to establish, maintain, and utilize a referral network of peers and related healthcare practitioners and organizations.
5.3.3. Basic knowledge of how to develop and maintain ongoing collaborative relationships.

Category 5.4. Personal and Professional Development and Continuing Education
5.4.1. Knowledge of the fundamental value of ongoing personal practice, long-term mentorship, and skills maintenance/development through continuing education.
5.4.2. Knowledge of when and how to seek advice and support for case consultation, educational advancement, and personal practice.

Course Completion Requirements:

Daily quizzes, completed and corrected in class.
All students are required to participate in the discussions.
Research and give a practice talk and then a final 5-minute talk on an assigned musculoskeletal topic as it relates to yoga therapy.
Class participation in yoga therapy practices and practice teaching. Students are given immediate feedback, from peers and faculty on all aspects of their observational, decision-making, record keeping and teaching skills.
They must complete the mentored practicum with one or more yoga therapy clients as assigned over a three-day period. Assessment feedback is given in group discussions at every step of the process and if necessary, privately.
At the end of the course students will receive a brief written evaluation on areas of strengths and areas that could use more work.
Understanding of learning objectives as demonstrated by satisfactory performance in hands on practicums, speech, quizzes and review sessions.

If these expectations are not met students will be given additional assignments and/or be required to repeat some or all of the course (which may incur additional residential costs).
Completion of Home Practicum Assignment is required.


SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Ayurveda

Course Hours: Total = 36

  • Residential: 26 (with 4 hours Practicum)
  • Distance: 10 (as Home Practice)
  • Practicum: 14 (4 Residential, 10 Distance)

Prerequisites

Enrollment in the Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training, AND,
*Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Principles

Teaching Format

This is a 4-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, review sessions, case studies, and practicum (distance).

Faculty

Nayaswami Mangala Loper-Powers, RN, MN, NP, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT, Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist, Ananda Minister

Required Texts/ Reading Materials

  • Frawley, David, Yoga & Ayurveda, Lotus Press, 1999.
  • Loper-Powers, Mangala, Ananda Yoga Therapy Training: Ayurveda Course Manual, 2018.

Recommended Resources

  • Frawley, David, Kozak, Sandra, Yoga for Your Type, Lotus Press, 2001.
  • Lad, Vasant, Ayurveda: The Science of Self-Healing, second edition, Lotus Press, 1985.
  • Lad, Vasant, The Complete Book of Ayurvedic Home Remedies, Harmony Books, 1998.
  • Gerson, Scott, Ayurveda: The Ancient Indian Healing Art, Element Books, Ltd., 1993.

Course Description/Progression of Course

This course builds on the Introduction to Ayurveda and Basic Ayurvedic Assessment that was part of the Yoga Therapy Training: Principles course.

(Thus, prior to this course, students have become familiar with the basic concepts of Ayurveda such as Prakruti/Consitution, Vikruti/current state of doshas, doshas and their relationships to the elements, dosha qualities, signs of doshas that are both balanced and imbalanced. They have also had some in-calss practice observing and questioning volunteers to begin to learn to see and to determine their predominant doshas. They have had the experience in their Home Practicum Assignment of observing and documenting primary dosha(s) and signs of primary dosha imbalances, and status of gunas, on their volunteer clients.)

This course begins with a review of what students learned in Principles, and an opportunity for Q & A. It covers how to bring doshas back into balance via appropriate yogic and ayurvedic therapies that are appropriate for use by yoga therapists. It outlines the Ayurvedic perspectives on stress, anxiety, depression, insomnia and immunity. Students then have an practicum with volunteers to asses their doshic responses to stress, and they give basic yoga therapy suggestions for addressing these dosha imbalances. Students also lead a session of Restorative Yoga for their volunteer clients which targets specific doshic imbalances.

The course also presents a more in-depth study of a broader range of fundamental Ayurvedic concepts, from which they are guided to understand the Ayurvedic perspecitves of health and disease (Competencies 1.3.1, #1-13), on anatomy& physiology (2.1.1-3), mental & emotional correlates with doshas (2.3.1 & 2.3.2), with the disease process (Samprapti) (1.3.2 #1 & 2), and how Ayurveda views the integration of body, mind, emotion, and spirit (2.5.1).

Students are given an overview (and review) of the Vedic Sciences and how they apply to Ayurveda and Yoga and the practice of yoga therapists. Included is presentation with emphasis on Sankhya, Vedanta, Tantra, and Yoga philosophies and how they impact the practice of yoga therapy (including topics in competency 1.1.1, a-c).

Next the course addresses a variety of medical conditions and the student learns to view them from an Ayurvedic perspective and learns some simple/basic Ayurvedic therapies that are appropriate to be include in their practice as yoga therapists. The students also learn briefly about some Ayurveda therapies which are beyond the scope of practice of a yoga therapist, but which are important for them to know about in order to make appropriate referrals to qualified Ayurvedic Practitioners. Yoga Therapy students are cautioned against thinking that this course prepares them to in any way be Ayurvedic Practitioners; nor are they qualified to determine a person’s Constitution/Prakruti. It is emphasized that the goal is for them to learn enough about Ayurveda to learn to identify probable doshic dominance (top 1 or 20 and signs of doshic imbalances, to apply simple Ayurvedic therapies in assisting clients to restore balance to their doshas (including using opposite qualities, basic Vata management). Students are also instructed in very basic Ayurvedic approaches to proper eating and proper diet for balancing doshas. Basic tenets of Ayurvedic lifestyle (vihara) are also presented.

Because of its critical role in health, per Ayurveda, the Ayurvedic view of a variety of Digestive Disorders is discussed. Students learn the importance of how lifestyle, diet and digestion are key factors in the maintenance of health or the development of disease. They learn simple Ayurvedic strategies for keeping digestion healthy, with some variations for each dosha.

Students learn how to lead yoga postures and pranayama with a focus on ‘dosha awareness’ and as a way to help keep all doshas balanced. They then demonstrate their ability to do this, as a means of teaching their clients how to apply opposite qualities in order to keep their doshas balanced.

Students have a Home Practice Assignment in which they do some basic assessment of their volunteer client’s primary dosha(s), their current guna constitution, any obvious dosha imbalances, and then they develop a yoga therapy Home Practice Plan (based on their SOAP Note) which demonstrates their ability to apply the knowledge of Ayurveda into the practice of yoga by their clients (4.1 & 4.2).

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, students will be able to know or do the following:

  1. Explain briefly how the Vedic Philosophies relate to Yoga and Ayurveda and the practice of yoga therapy.
  2. Describe what doshas are, their elemental (both gross & subtle) components, their qualities, their signs of being balanced and imbalanced.
  3. Explain the meaning of Prakruti and Vikruti and how they influence the yogic and Ayurvedic therapeutic approaches to yoga therapy.
  4. Briefly explain how stress manifests in different doshas.
  5. Describe how yoga practices can be used to specifically reduce dosha imbalances in stress, anxiety, insomnia, and depression (using general Ayurvedic principles of calming/pacifying, strengthening, and purifying, as they relate to yogic practices).
  6. Explain why ‘Vata Management’ is an important guideline for use by yoga therapists.
  7. Briefly explain the Ayurvedic view of the development of the disease process (samprapti).
  8. Discuss why it is important to focus on digestive system function and symptoms when applying Ayurvedic principles to yoga therapy.
  9. Discuss the role of Ayurvedic Lifestyle and its key components as it relates to the practice of yoga therapy.
  10. Explain ‘healthy eating’ from an Ayurvedic perspective.
  11. List the basic qualities of foods that help to balance each of the 3 doshas.
  12. Explain why ‘time of day’ is an important consideration in Ayurveda and how it can be used in the practice of yoga therapy.
  13. Describe the qualities in the practice of asana, pranayama, meditation, and affirmation that will help to balance each of the 3 doshas.

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered

Section 1: Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings & Philosophy
1.1.1 Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya,Yoga,Tantra, and Ayurveda.
a. tanmatra/bhuta/indriya (subtle element/gross elements/senses);
b. purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
c. pancamaya kosha (dimensions of the human system);
e. duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on the structure, states, functioning, and conditions of the mind, including, but not limited to,
1.2.1.1 drashtr (seer), drshya (seen);
1.2.1.2 antahkarana citta (consciousness), buddhi (intellect), ahamkara (ego), manas (mind);
1.2.1.3 citta vrtti (activities of the mind), citta parinama (structural changes in the mind), vyutthana/nirodha (mind's potential for distraction and focus)

Category 1.3. Framework for Health & Disease
1.3.1 Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy, including the concepts of

1.3.1.1 panca maya (kosha) (fundamental structure of the human system)
1.3.1.2 subtle anatomy
1.3.1.3 tri-dosha (effect of the elements on the physical body)
1.3.1.4 tri-guna (effect of sattva (equilibrium), rajas (activity), tamas [(inertia]);
1.3.1.5 prakrti/vikrti (dosha constitution at birth/imbalance of the dosha currently expressed in the body)
1.3.1.6 ama (undigested food, emotions, etc. accumulated in the body)
1.3.1.7 agni (internal fire(s) and their contribution to health)
1.3.1.8 prana vayu (prana, apana, vyana, udana,samana)
1.3.1.9 prana prakopa (disturbance of the vayu)
1.3.1.10 surya/chandra (sun/moon)
1.3.1.11 brmhana/langhana (expansion/contraction)
1.3.1.12 vyuha model: heya (the symptoms), hetu (the causes), hana (the goal), upaya (the tools)

1.3.2 Knowledge of categorizing illness, including:
1.3.2.1 Development/evolution of disease (samprapti [pathogenisis], including but not limited to direction, intensity, onset, and duration and their influence on the ease or difficulty of healing and disease management.
1.3.2.2 Setting priorities: symptoms/pacification (shamana [short term]) and purification/strengthening (shodhana [long term]).

Section 2. Biomedical & Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.2 Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3 Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.1 Basic knowledge of commonly occurring mental health conditions— from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions—their symptoms, and common approaches/interventions, as they relate to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.3.2 Basic knowledge of psychological concepts and terminology, including mood, cognition, behavior, and personality, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.1 In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama in the context of yoga therapy.
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1 asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation),
3.1.2.4 Vihara (lifestyle modifications) including basic yogic dietary concepts.
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Section 4. Yoga Therapy Tools and Application
Category 4.1. Yoga Practices
4.1.1 In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
4.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects
4.1.2 Demonstrated ability to elicit the goals, expectations, and aspirations of the client/student.
4.1.3 Demonstrated ability to integrate information from the intake, evaluation, and observation to develop a working assessment of the client's condition, limitations, and possibilities.
4.1.4 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.5 Demonstrated ability to identify priorities and set both long- and short-term goals with the client/student.
4.1.6 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of pacification, purification, and strengthening strategies.
4.1.7 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of strategies that address common disorders and pathologies of the major human systems and common mental health conditions, as well as other goals and aspirations of the student as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
4.1.8 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9 Demonstrated knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10 Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11 Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice, including
4.1.11.1 Providing instruction, demonstration, education of the client/student using multimodal strategies of education such as auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learning tools;
4.1.11.2 Providing supportive strategies for the client/student to actively participate in his/her practice, such as a means to remember his/her practice (e.g., auditory and visual tools).
4.1.12 Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships including
4.1.12.1 Fostering trust by establishing an appropriate therapeutic environment through privacy, confidentiality, and safety;
4.1.12.2 Practicing effective, client/student-centered communication based upon a respect for, and sensitivity to, individual, familial, cultural, social, ethnic, and religious factors.
4.1.13 Demonstrated ability to provide follow up and re-planning, including
4.1.13.1 Gathering feedback, re-assess, and refine the practice and to determine short-term and long-term goals and priorities;
4.1.13.2 Addressing new and changing conditions, goals, aspirations, and priorities of the student/client and to provide appropriate support;
4.1.13.3 Providing appropriate closure for the therapy sessions.

Course Completion Requirements

  • Attendance at all classes.
  • Completion of all assigned readings. (see below)
  • Participation in class discussions and activities (including case studies, review sessions, practicums). Participation needs to reflect that the student has learned and begun to assimilate the information from their assigned readings. (The faculty will be assessing whether the student has achieved the level of knowledge and appropriate application of that knowledge according to the IAYT Competencies that apply.)
  • Satisfactory performance on in-class (80%) (closed-book) Quizzes. This will indicate an achievement of the stated course Learning Objectives. Students will be given Answer Keys to the Quizzes immediately after taking them, and there will then be time for further Q & A and group discussion with faculty.
  • During in-class practicums, students must provide yoga therapy interventions in a safe and appropriate manner, in accordance with the IAYT Competencies for providing yoga therapy (Sections 4.1 & 4.2), as determined by supervising faculty. Students are given immediate feedback from faculty and peers on all aspects of their observational, assessment, decision-making, planning, teaching and record-keeping skills.
  • Satisfactory completion of the Home Practice Assignment. (see below) Students are given written feedback by supervising faculty, along with an offer to speak in person or by phone in addition. If the expected standard of satisfactory performance (set by IAYT Standards and Competencies) is not met, then students will be given additional guidance and assignments as needed until they can demonstrate the expected competency.
  • If any of the above requirements or expectations are not met, the student will be counseled and/or given additional assignments in order to help them be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance.

SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Health Challenges-1

Course Hours: Total = 64 (Residential and Distance)

  • Residential = 37
  • Distance = 27 (as Home Practicum)
  • Practicum = 27 (as Home Practicum)

Prerequisites

Enrollment in Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training; AND,
*Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Principles, AND
*Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Ayurveda

Teaching Format

This is a 7-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, case studies and practicum (as part of distance, Home Practicum Assignment).

Course Description

Yoga therapy has proved extremely helpful for many chronic health conditions. This course covers Stress, Anxiety, Depression, Insomnia, Hypertension, Stroke, Cancer, Pre-Menstrual Syndrome, Dysmenorrhea and Menopause. We review the anatomy of systems involved and basic pathophysiology. Medical / Ayurvedic/ subtle energy perspective on these health challenges are addressed to guide the therapist choice of interventions. Case studies are presented to provide time in practical application of the concepts in class. Students also apply the knowledge gained by writing up their experience working with volunteer clients in their community and then receiving individualized feed back from course instructors.

Faculty

Nayaswami Mangala Loper-Powers, RN, MN, NP, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT, Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist
Maitri Jones, RN, BSN, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT
Barbara Bingham, RPT, BS, CYT, Ananda Yoga Therapist

Required Texts/Reading Materials

  • McCall, Timothy B. Yoga as Medicine: The Yogic Prescription for Health & Healing. New York: Bantam, 2012.
  • Ananda Yoga Therapy Training: Health Challenges-1 Manual. The Expanding Light, 2018.

Learning Objectives

At the completion of the course, students will know:

  • Basic pathophysiology and medical terminology of Stress, Anxiety, Depression, Insomnia, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinsons disorders, Hypertension, Stroke , Cancer, Pre-menstrual syndrome, Dysmenorrhea and Menopause, including how they impact a person’s life physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually
  • What research has been done to support the use of yoga therapy in these conditions
  • Rationale that guide a therapists choices of pranayama, energization exercises, asanas, restorative poses, affirmations and visualization/meditation techniques or each condition
  • How to assess your clients’ needs in terms of developing an individualized yoga therapy plan for them
  • How to evaluate your yoga therapy plans and to modify them as needed
  • Ways to develop group classes for people with these conditions

Subject Matter/Competencies Covered

Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Disease

1.3.1 Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy.
1.3.1.10. surya/chandra (sun/moon);
1.3.1.2. subtle anatomy;
1.3.1.3. tri-dosha (effect of the elements on the physical body);
1.3.1.4. tri-guna (effect of sattva (equilibrium), rajas (activity), tamas [inertia]);
1.3.1.8. prana vayu (prana, apana, vyana, udana,samana);
1.3.2 Knowledge of categorizing illness.
1.3.2.1 Development/evolution of disease (samprapti [pathogenesis]), including but not limited to direction, intensity, onset, and duration and their influence on the ease or difficulty of healing and disease management.
1.3.2.2 Setting priorities: symptoms/pacification (shamana [short term]) and purification/strengthening (shodhana [long term]).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.2 Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3 Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.1 Familiarity with commonly used drugs and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.2.2 Familiarity with common medical terminology.
2.2.3 Knowledge of how to reference current healthcare information relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including pathologies, disorders, drugs, and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.1 Basic knowledge of commonly occurring mental health conditions— from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions—their symptoms, and common approaches/interventions, as they relate to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.3.2 Basic knowledge of psychological concepts and terminology, including mood, cognition, behavior, and personality, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions. Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1. asana (postures);
3.1.2.2. pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3. meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation), and ritualized activities such as nyasa and mudra.
3.1.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.

Category 3.2 Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.2 Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.
3.2.4 In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.

Category 3.3 Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.
3.3.4. In-depth Knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.

Category 3.4 Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1. Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 4. Practicum

Category 4.1 Providing Yoga Therapy
4.1.1. Demonstrated ability to conduct intake and assess the client/student, including
4.1.1.1. Taking a history of the client and his/her condition(s); and
4.1.1.2. Assessing the current condition using the tools relevant to the yoga therapist, including an evaluation of the physical, energetic, mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of well-being.
4.1.2. Demonstrated ability to elicit the goals, expectations, and aspirations of the client/student.
4.1.3. Demonstrated ability to integrate information from the intake, evaluation, and observation to develop a working assessment of the client's condition, limitations, and possibilities.
4.1.4. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.5. Demonstrated ability to identify priorities and set both long- and short-term goals with the client/student.
4.1.6. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of pacification, purification, and strengthening strategies.
4.1.7. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of strategies that address common disorders and pathologies of the major human systems and common mental health conditions, as well as other goals and aspirations of the student as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
4.1.8. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9. Demonstrated knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10. Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11. Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice.
4.1.12. Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships.
4.1.13. Demonstrated ability to provide follow up and re-planning.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.4. In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy, resulting in the demonstrated ability to discern the need for referral to other modalities.

Category 5.3. Relationships with Peers, Mentors, Clinicians, and Organizations
5.3.1. Basic knowledge of other healthcare fields and their potential role in and relevance to the work of a yoga therapist.

Course Completion Requirements

  • Attendance at all classes.
  • Completion of all assigned readings. (see below)
  • Participation in class discussions and activities (including case studies, review sessions, practicums). Participation needs to reflect that the student has learned and begun to assimilate the information from their assigned readings. (The faculty will be assessing whether the student has achieved the level of knowledge and appropriate application of that knowledge according to the IAYT Competencies that apply.)
  • Satisfactory performance (80%) on in-class (closed-book) Quizzes. This will indicate an achievement of the stated course Learning Objectives. Students will be given Answer Keys to the Quizzes immediately after taking them, and there will then be time for further Q & A and group discussion with faculty.
  • During in-class practicums, students must provide yoga therapy interventions in a safe and appropriate manner, in accordance with the IAYT Competencies for providing yoga therapy (Sections 4.1 & 4.2), as determined by supervising faculty. Students are given immediate feedback from faculty and peers on all aspects of their observational, assessment, decision-making, planning, teaching and record-keeping skills.
  • Satisfactory completion of the Home Practice Assignment. (see below) Students are given written feedback by supervising faculty, along with an offer to speak in person or by phone in addition. If the expected standard of satisfactory performance (set by IAYT Standards and Competencies) is not met, then students will be given additional guidance and assignments as needed until they can demonstrate the expected competency.
  • If any of the above requirements or expectations are not met, the student will be counseled and/or given additional assignments in order to help them be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance.

Reading Assignments

  • Ananda Yoga Therapy Training: Health Challenges-1 Manual. The Expanding Light, 2018.
  • McCall, Timothy B. Yoga as Medicine: The Yogic Prescription for Health & Healing. New York: Bantam, 2012. Print.
    p. 207 Cancer
    p. 261 Depression
    p. 335 Heart Disease
    p. 359 Hypertension
    p. 410 Insomnia
    p. 443 Menopause

SYLLABUS
Ananda Meditation® Solutions

Course Contact Hours: 33 (Residential)

Prerequisite for level 2 certification

Students need to attend Ananda Meditation® Teacher Training Level 1 and need to be teaching meditation for about 1 year. A regular home practice of daily meditation is also ideal. An application from our website must be filled out and approved by the course Instructor.

Teaching Format

Meditation Solutions is a full second level of certification, and it consists of two course modules—“Meditation Solutions” and “Spiritual Counseling”, each of which is offered once each year. Either course can be taken first.

Course Description

In this 7-day training students explore how to use meditation for finding solutions to daily life problems. Meditation teachers and yoga therapists will gain skills to use personally and to teach their students.

Faculty: Ananda Ministers

Nayaswami Diksha McCord, BSc, BA, Level 2 Ananda Yoga & Meditation Teacher
Nayaswami Gyandev McCord, PhD, E-RYT 500, Director of Ananda Yoga
Nayaswami Anandi Cornell, BA, Kriyacharya, Level 2 Ananda Meditation Teacher

Required Texts/Reading Materials

Simpson, Savitri, and J. Donald. Walters. Chakras for Starters: Unlock the Hidden Door to Peace and Well-being. Nevada City, CA: Crystal Clarity, 2002. Print.
Students must also read the MTT 2 Meditation Solutions Manual, which is included in the course.

Reading Assignments

Meditation Teacher Training Level 2 Manual Table of Contents
Meditation Solutions--Inner Tools for Real-Life Issues

Part 1 Meditation Solutions
Awaken to Superconsciousness

Part 2 Meditation Solutions
Pranayama and Personal Effectiveness

Part 3 Meditation Solutions
Affirmations and Visualizations

Part 4 Meditation Solutions
Working with the Chakras

Part 5 Meditation Solutions
Nature Meditations

Part 6 Meditation Solutions
Relationships and Health

Learning Objectives

Students will know practices to help their students/clients deal with difficult issues in their lives. By the end of the course, students will know:

  • The three levels of consciousness: Where do solutions reside?
  • How to use meditation techniques to find solutions.
  • Introspection and personal commitment.
  • How to deepen your meditation practice.
  • Tools to help raise consciousness and how to use them: affirmations, visualizations, pranayama.
  • Working with the chakras to transmute negative energy.
  • How to find solutions to specific issues. (health, relationships, money, stress)
  • Discussion of questions that you as teachers face with your students.
  • Daily special guided sadhanas to help deepen your meditation and variety of ways to go deeper in meditation.
  • One day of guided seclusion to go deeper into your personal transformation. Tips on how to benefit from silence and find your own answers.
  • Student teaching sessions. Each student presents a 30 min of how to use meditation to solve problems in daily life, with a specific area of difficulty. After presentation, a feedback is given by a senior teacher.

Subject Matter/Competencies Covered

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1 Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya,Yoga,Tantra, and Ayurveda. Examples of concepts and models from the above teachings and philosophy relevant to yoga therapy, include but are not limited to,
a. tanmatra/bhuta/indriya (subtle element/gross elements/senses);
b. purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
c. pancamaya kosha (dimensions of the human system);
e. duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on the structure, states, functioning, and conditions of the mind, including, but not limited to,
1.2.1.1 drashtr (seer), drshya (seen);
1.2.1.2 antahkarana citta (consciousness), buddhi (intellect), ahamkara (ego), manas (mind);
1.2.1.3 citta vrtti (activities of the mind), citta parinama (structural changes in the mind), vyutthana/nirodha (mind's potential for distraction and focus);
1.2.1.4 artha (cognition), bhava (mood), svabhava (inborn nature), vasana (residue of experience), samskara (conditioned pattern of thinking and behavior); and
1.2.1.5 states of mind: mudha (stupefied/dull), kshipta (disturbed), vikshipta (alternating between distraction and focus), ekagrata (one-pointed), nirodha (focus enveloped/held/ restrained), vaishvanara (waking), taijasa (dream), prajña (deep sleep), turiya (beyond).

Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Disease
1.3.2 Knowledge of categorizing illness, including
1.3.2.1 Development/evolution of disease (samprapti [pathogenisis]), including but not limited to direction, intensity, onset, and duration and their influence on the ease or difficulty of healing and disease management.
1.3.2.2 Setting priorities: symptoms/pacification (shamana [short term]) and purification/strengthening (shodhana [long term]).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.2 Familiarity with common medical terminology

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.1 Basic knowledge of commonly occurring mental health conditions— from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions—their symptoms, and common approaches/interventions, as they relate to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.3.2 Basic knowledge of psychological concepts and terminology, including mood, cognition, behavior, and personality, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
2.4.1 Familiarity with models of human development, including developmental stages, lifecycles, and personality, and their importance to medical and psychological health and well-being.
2.4.2 Familiarity with the influence of familial, social, cultural, and religious conditioning on mental and medical perspectives of health and healing.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1 asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation),
3.1.2.4 vihara (lifestyle modifications) including basic yogic dietary concepts.

Category 3.2. Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills: listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2 Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3 Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.
3.2.4. In-depth Knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.

Category 3.3. Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.4. Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1. Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.4. Personal and Professional Development and Continuing Education
5.4.1 Knowledge of the fundamental value of ongoing personal practice, long-term mentorship, and skills maintenance/development through continuing education.
5.4.2 Knowledge of when and how to seek advice and support for case consultation, educational advancement, and personal practice.

Course Completion Requirements

Our goal for the MTT level 2 is to help the teachers deepen their own meditation practice, and tap into their own inner source of inspiration, solutions and realize that there is a power within them that they can draw strength and upliftment, and also to give them tools to help others deepen their own meditation and use it in their daily life to finding solutions to life’s problems. Students must:

  1. Attend all classes and student practices
  2. Attend all required sadhanas, plus one on Saturday
  3. Complete the Required Readings
  4. Complete student teaching assignment: a 30 minutes presentation and guided meditation including affirmation and visualization on one of the areas of challenge: Health, relationships, work, stress, money. After presentation, a feedback is given by a senior teacher.
  5. Attend Lunch conferences with assigned faculty and/or ministers.

SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training:
Psychology & Mental Health
Exploring Yogic, Ayurvedic and Western Perspectives

Course Hours: Total = 42 (Residential and Distance)

  • Residential: 29
  • Distance: 13 (as Home Practicum)
  • Practicum: 13 Distance (as Home Practicum)

Prerequisites

  • Enrollment in the Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training program, AND,
  • Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Principles, AND,
  • Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Ayurveda, AND
  • Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Health Challenges-1

Teaching Format

This is a 5-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, case studies in large and small groups, and practicum (distance, as Home Practicum Assignment).

Faculty

Therese Smith MA, MFT, Ananda Yoga Teacher, Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapist
Nayaswami Mangala Loper-Powers RN, MN, NP, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT, Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist
Nayaswami Mantradevi LoCicero, Ananda Yoga and Meditation Teacher, Spiritual Counselor

Required Texts/Reading Materials

  • McCall, Timothy B. Yoga as Medicine: The Yogic Prescription for Health & Healing. New York: Bantam, 2012.
  • Forbes, Bo. Yoga for Emotional Balance, Shambala, 2011.
  • Frawley, David, Ayurveda & the Mind: the Healing of Consciousness, Lotus Press, 1996.
  • Ananda Yoga Therapy Training: Psychology & Mental Health Manual. The Expanding Light.

Recommended Texts

Emerson, D., Hopper, E., Overcoming Trauma through Yoga, North Atlantic Books, 2011.
Nurrie Stearns, M, and Nurrie Stearns, R, Yoga for Emotional Trauma: Meditations and Practices for Healing Pain and Suffering, New Harbinger, 2013.
Weingraub, A. Yoga for Depression, Broadway Books, 2004.

Course Description

Yoga therapy has proved helpful for many chronic mental health conditions, and we explore these with an overall orientation to the reality of body-mind integration. This course covers a multi-dimensional view of psychology and mental health, from Western, Ayurvedic, Yogic and Subtle Energy perspectives, which are addressed to guide the therapist's choice of interventions. Case studies are presented to provide time in practical application of the concepts in class. Therapeutic skills for communicating with and teaching clients are taught and practiced in case study sessions. Also covered are working therapeutically with groups, practicing ethically, and how to develop and use referral networks with mental health practitioners.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, students will:

  • Know basic pathophysiology, symptoms, treatments (including medications) and medical terminology of a variety of common mental health conditions, ranging from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions, including how they impact a person’s life physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually.
  • Know how to and demonstrate the ability (via case studies) to incorporate any contraindications related to mental health conditions into the development of a yoga therapy plan for clients.
  • Know how developmental models of human development and influences of familial, social, cultural, and religious conditioning influence mental health conditions and healing.
  • Know how Yogic and Ayurvedic views of the mind and personality can help the yoga therapist to create appropriate yoga therapy plans for those with a variety of psychological and mental health conditions.
  • Know and be able to demonstrate good communication skills, including listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue; how to set appropriate therapeutic boundaries.
  • Know how to do a basic evaluation of a person’s mental and emotional dimensions of well-being, and when it is appropriate to refer to a mental health professional.
  • Know how to and be able to demonstrate (via case studies) the ability to apply appropriate yoga therapy to those with common mental health conditions, and how to collaborate with mental health practitioners as needed.
  • Know effective teaching methods and how to adapt to different styles of learning.
  • Know therapeutic ways to develop and manage group classes for people with these psychological/mental health conditions.

Subject Matter / IAYT Competencies covered

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1 Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya,Yoga,Tantra, and Ayurveda.
Examples of concepts and models from the above teachings and philosophy relevant to yoga therapy, include but are not limited to,
a. tanmatra/bhuta/indriya (subtle element/gross elements/senses);
b. purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
c. pancamaya kosha (dimensions of the human system);
d. guna (fundamental forces of nature); and
e. duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on the structure, states, functioning, and conditions of the mind, including, but not limited to,
1.2.1.1 drashtr (seer), drshya (seen);
1.2.1.2 antahkarana citta (consciousness), buddhi (intellect), ahamkara (ego), manas (mind);
1.2.1.3 citta vrtti (activities of the mind), citta parinama (structural changes in the mind), vyutthana/nirodha (mind's potential for distraction and focus);
1.2.1.4 artha (cognition), bhava (mood), svabhava (inborn nature), vasana (residue of experience), samskara (conditioned pattern of thinking and behavior); and
1.2.1.5 states of mind: mudha (stupefied/dull), kshipta (disturbed), vikshipta (alternating between distraction and focus), ekagrata (one-pointed), nirodha (focus enveloped/held/ restrained), vaishvanara (waking), taijasa (dream), prajña (deep sleep), turiya (beyond).
1.2.2 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on distracted/disturbed conditions of mind and their expressions as expressed in such texts as the Yoga Sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, and other texts, including but not limited to,
1.2.2.1 klesha (affliction);
1.2.2.2 lobha, krodha, and moha (greed, anger, attachment);
1.2.2.3 duhkha and daurmanasya (suffering/discomfort and negative attitude/thinking), sarupyam (identification with the contents of the mind or seer taking the same form as the mind); and
1.2.2.4 antaraya (obstacles to progress in yoga).

Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Disease
1.3.1 Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy, including the concepts of
1.3.1.1 panca maya (kosha) (fundamental structure of the human system);
1.3.1.2 subtle anatomy;
1.3.1.3 tri-dosha (effect of the elements on the physical body);
1.3.1.4 tri-guna (effect of sattva (equilibrium), rajas (activity), tamas [(inertia]);
1.3.1.5 prakrti/vikrti (dosha constitution at birth/imbalance of the dosha currently expressed in the body);
1.3.1.6 ama (undigested food, emotions, etc. accumulated in the body);
1.3.1.7 agni (internal fire(s) and their contribution to health);
1.3.1.8 prana vayu (prana, apana, vyana, udana,samana);
1.3.1.9 prana prakopa (disturbance of the vayu);
1.3.1.10 surya/chandra (sun/moon);
1.3.1.11 brmhana/langhana (expansion/contraction); and
1.3.1.12 vyuha model: heya (the symptoms), hetu (the causes), hana (the goal),upaya (the tools).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations
Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
Suggested Guidelines: 90 hours minimum for this category
2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3 Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications,
as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.1 Familiarity with commonly used drugs and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.2.2 Familiarity with common medical terminology.
2.2.3 Knowledge of how to reference current healthcare information relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including pathologies, disorders, drugs,
and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.1 Basic knowledge of commonly occurring mental health conditions— from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions—their symptoms, and common approaches/interventions, as they relate to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.3.2 Basic knowledge of psychological concepts and terminology, including mood,
cognition, behavior, and personality, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
Suggested Guidelines: 10 hours minimum for this category
2.4.1 Familiarity with models of human development, including developmental stages, lifecycles, and personality, and their importance to medical and psychological health and well-being.
2.4.2 Familiarity with the influence of familial, social, cultural, and religious conditioning on mental and medical perspectives of health and healing.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Practices
3.1.1 In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1 asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation), and ritualized activities such as nyasa and mudra; and
3.1.2.4 vihara (lifestyle modifications) including basic yogic dietary concepts.
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.2. Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills: listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.
3.2.4. In-depth Knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.

Category 3.3. Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.4. Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1. Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 4. Practicum

Category 4.1. Provide Yoga Therapy
4.1.1 Demonstrated ability to conduct intake and assess the client/student, including
4.1.1.1 Taking a history of the client and his/her condition(s); and
4.1.1.2 Assessing the current condition using the tools relevant to the yoga therapist, including an evaluation of the physical, energetic, mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of well-being.
4.1.2 Demonstrated ability to elicit the goals, expectations, and aspirations of the client/student.
4.1.3 Demonstrated ability to integrate information from the intake, evaluation, and observation to develop a working assessment of the client's condition, limitations, and possibilities.
4.1.4 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.5 Demonstrated ability to identify priorities and set both long- and short-term goals with the client/student.
4.1.6 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of pacification, purification, and strengthening strategies.
4.1.7 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of strategies that address common disorders and pathologies of the major human systems and common mental health conditions, as well as other goals and aspirations of the student as
4.1.8 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9 Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10 Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11 Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice, including
4.1.11.1 providing instruction, demonstration, education of the client/student using multimodal strategies of education such as auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learning tools; and
4.1.11.2 providing supportive strategies for the client/student to actively participate in his/her practice, such as a means to remember his/her practice (e.g., auditory and visual tools).
4.1.12 Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships including
4.1.12.1 fostering trust by establishing an appropriate therapeutic environment through privacy, confidentiality, and safety; and
4.1.12.2 practicing effective, client/student-centered communication based upon a respect for, and sensitivity to, individual, familial, cultural, social, ethnic, and religious factors.
4.1.13 Demonstrated ability to provide follow up and re-planning, including
4.1.13.1 gathering feedback, re-assess, and refine the practice and to determine short-term and long-term goals and priorities;
4.1.13.2 addressing new and changing conditions, goals, aspirations, and priorities of the student/client and to provide appropriate support; and
4.1.13.3 providing appropriate closure for the therapy sessions.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1 In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.2 In-depth knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles of health care codes of conduct and yoga's ethical principles.
5.1.4 In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy, resulting in the demonstrated ability to discern the need for referral to other modalities.
5.1.5 Knowledge of the extent of one's own individual training, skills, and evolving experience in yoga therapy, and knowledge of the importance of practicing within such parameters.

Category 5.2. Legal, Regulatory, and Business Issues Pertaining to Yoga Therapy
5.2.1 Knowledge of current relevant local, state, and national laws and regulations impacting the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 5.3. Relationships with Peers, Mentors, Clinicians, and Organizations
5.3.1 Basic knowledge of other healthcare fields and their potential role in and relevance to the work of a yoga therapist.
5.3.2 Basic knowledge of how to establish, maintain, and utilize a referral network of peers and related healthcare practitioners and organizations.
5.3.3 Basic knowledge of how to develop and maintain ongoing collaborative relationships.

Category 5.4. Personal and Professional Development and Continuing Education
5.4.1 Knowledge of the fundamental value of ongoing personal practice, long-term mentorship, and skills maintenance/development through continuing education.
5.4.2 Knowledge of when and how to seek advice and support for case consultation, educational advancement, and personal practice.

Course Completion Requirements

  • Attendance at all classes.
  • Completion of all assigned readings. (see below)
  • Participation in class discussions and activities (including case studies, review sessions, practicums). Participation needs to reflect that the student has learned and begun to assimilate the information from their assigned readings. (The faculty will be assessing whether the student has achieved the level of knowledge and appropriate application of that knowledge according to the IAYT Competencies that apply.)
  • Satisfactory performance on in-class (closed-book) Quizzes. This will indicate an achievement of the stated course Learning Objectives. Students will be given Answer Keys to the Quizzes immediately after taking them, and there will then be time for further Q & A and group discussion with faculty.
  • During in-class case studies, students must provide yoga therapy interventions in a safe and appropriate manner, in accordance with the IAYT Competencies for providing yoga therapy (Section 4, Category 4.1 ), as determined by supervising faculty. Students are given immediate feedback from faculty and peers on all aspects of their observational, assessment, decision-making, planning, teaching and record-keeping skills.
  • Satisfactory completion of the Home Practice Assignment. (see below) Students are given written feedback by supervising faculty, along with an offer to speak in person or by phone in addition. If the expected standard of satisfactory performance (set by IAYT Standards and Competencies) is not met, then students will be given additional guidance and assignments as needed until they can demonstrate the expected competency.
  • If any of the above requirements or expectations are not met, the student will be counseled and/or given additional assignments in order to help them be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance.

Reading Assignments

  • McCall, Timothy B. Yoga as Medicine: The Yogic Prescription for Health & Healing. New York: Bantam, 2012: Chapter 8, Anxiety & Panic Attacks.
  • Frawley, David, Ayurveda & the Mind: the Healing of Consciousness, Lotus Press, 1996: Foreward, pp: 1-10, 43-57, 125-142, 149-168, 223-235, Ch. 16 & 17, p. 314-316.
  • All the contents of the Ananda Yoga Therapy Training: Psychology & Mental Health Manual. The Expanding Light, 2013.


SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Health Challenges-2

Course Hours: Total = 57 (Residential and Distance)

  • Residential = 30
  • Distance = 27 (as Home Practicum)
  • Practicum = 27 (as Home Practicum)

Prerequisites

  • Enrollment in Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training; AND,
  • Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Principles, AND,
  • Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Health Challenges-1, AND
  • Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Ayurveda

Teaching Format

This is a 5-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, and case studies, and practicum (distance).

Course Description

Yoga therapy has proved extremely helpful for many chronic health conditions. This course covers Obesity, Diabetes, Thyroid Disorders, Congestive Heart Failure, Autoimmune Disorders, Chronic Pain, Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Headaches (Tension & Migraine), Asthma, COPD, Multiple Sclerosis, and Parkinson's Disease, and PTSD. We review the anatomy of systems involved and basic pathophysiology for these conditions. Medical / ayurvedic/ subtle energy perspective on these health challenges are addressed to guide the therapist choice of interventions. Case studies are presented to provide time in practical application of the concepts in class. Students also apply the knowledge gained by writing up their experience working with volunteer clients in their community and then receiving individualized feed back from course instructors.

Faculty: Ananda Ministers and Certified Meditation Teachers

Nayaswami Mangala Loper-Powers RN, MN, NP, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT, Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist
Maitri Jones, RN, BSN, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT
Barbara Bingham, RPT, BS, CYT, Ananda Yoga Therapist

Required Texts/Reading Materials

  • McCall, Timothy B. Yoga as Medicine: The Yogic Prescription for Health & Healing. New York: Bantam, 2012.
  • Ananda Yoga TherapyTraining: Health Challenges-2 Manual. The Expanding Light, 2018.

Learning Objectives

At the completion of the course, students will know:

  • Basic pathophysiology and medical terminology of Obesity, Diabetes, Congestive Heart Failure, Autoimmune Disorders, Chronic Pain, Fibromyalgia, Headaches (Tension & Migraine), Asthma, COPD, PTSD, Multiple Sclerosis, and Parkinson's Disease, including how they impact a person’s life physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually
  • What research has been done to support the use of yoga therapy in these conditions, including an approach to Trauma-Sensitive Yoga
  • Rationale that guide a therapists choices of pranayama, energization exercises, asanas, restorative poses, affirmations and visualization/meditation techniques or each condition
  • How to assess your clients’ needs in terms of developing an individualized yoga therapy plan for them
  • How to evaluate your yoga therapy plans and to modify them as needed
  • Ways to develop group classes for people with these conditions

Subject Matter/Competencies Covered

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1. Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachings from Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya, Yoga,Tantra, and Ayurveda. Examples of concepts and models from the above teachings and philosophy relevant to yoga therapy, include but are not limited to,
a. tanmatra/bhuta/indriya (subtle element/gross elements/senses);
b. purusha/prakrti (consciousness/material world);
c. pancamaya kosha (dimensions of the human system);
d. guna (fundamental forces of nature); and
e. duhkha (suffering/discomfort).

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.2. Knowledge of yoga perspectives on distracted/disturbed conditions of mind and their expressions as expressed in such texts as the Yoga Sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, and other texts, including but not limited to
1.2.2.1. klesha (affliction);
1.2.2.3. duhkha and daurmanasya (suffering/discomfort and negative attitude/thinking), sarupyam (identification with the contents of the mind or seer taking the same form as the mind).

Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Diseasee

1.3.1. Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy.
1.3.1.2. subtle anatomy;
1.3.1.3. tri-dosha (effect of the elements on the physical body);
1.3.1.8. prana vayu (prana, apana, vyana, udana,samana);
1.3.1.9. prana prakopa (disturbance of the vayu);
1.3.2. Knowledge of categorizing illness.
1.3.2.1 Development/evolution of disease (samprapti [pathogenesis]), including but not limited to direction, intensity, onset, and duration and their influence on the ease or difficulty of healing and disease management.
1.3.2.2 Setting priorities:symptoms/pacification (shamana [short term]) and purification/strengthening (shodhana [long term]).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology

2.1.1. Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.2. Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3. Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.1. Familiarity with commonly used drugs and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.2.2. Familiarity with common medical terminology.
2.2.3. Knowledge of how to reference current healthcare information relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including pathologies, disorders, drugs,

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.1 Basic knowledge of commonly occurring mental health conditions—from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions—their symptoms, and common approaches/interventions, as they relate to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.3.2 Basic knowledge of psychological concepts and terminology, including mood, cognition, behavior, and personality, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
2.4.1 Familiarity with models of human development, including developmental stages, lifecycles, and personality, and their importance to medical and psychological health and well-being.
2.4.2 Familiarity with the influence of familial, social, cultural, and religious conditioning on mental and medical perspectives of health and healing.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1. Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Therapy Tools
3.1.1 In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.2 Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills: listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.
3.2.4. In-depth Knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.

Category 3.3 Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Section 4. Practicum

Category 4.1 Providing Yoga Therapy
4.1.1. Demonstrated ability to conduct intake and assess the client/student, including
4.1.1.1. Taking a history of the client and his/her condition(s); and
4.1.1.2. Assessing the current condition using the tools relevant to the yoga therapist, including an evaluation of the physical, energetic, mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of well-being.
4.1.2. Demonstrated ability to elicit the goals, expectations, and aspirations of the client/student.
4.1.3. Demonstrated ability to integrate information from the intake, evaluation, and observation to develop a working assessment of the client's condition, limitations, and possibilities.
4.1.4. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.5. Demonstrated ability to identify priorities and set both long- and short-term goals with the client/student.
4.1.6. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of pacification, purification, and strengthening strategies.
4.1.7. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of strategies that address common disorders and pathologies of the major human systems and common mental health conditions, as well as other goals and aspirations of the student as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
4.1.8. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9. Demonstrated knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10. Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11. Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice.
4.1.12. Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships.
4.1.13. Demonstrated ability to provide follow up and re-planning.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.4. In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy, resulting in the demonstrated ability to discern the need for referral to other modalities.

Category 5.2. Legal, Regulatory, and Business Issues Pertaining to Yoga Therapy
5.2.2 Basic knowledge of business practices relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including record keeping, planning, and financial management.

Category 5.3. Relationships with Peers, Mentors, Clinicians, and Organizations
5.3.1. Basic knowledge of other healthcare fields and their potential role in and relevance to the work of a yoga therapist.

Course Completion Requirements

  • Attendance at all classes.
  • Completion of all assigned readings. (see below)
  • Participation in class discussions and activities (including case studies, review sessions, practicums). Participation needs to reflect that the student has learned and begun to assimilate the information from their assigned readings. (The faculty will be assessing whether the student has achieved the level of knowledge and appropriate application of that knowledge according to the IAYT Competencies that apply.)
  • Satisfactory performance (80%) on in-class (closed-book) Quizzes. This will indicate an achievement of the stated course Learning Objectives. Students will be given Answer Keys to the Quizzes immediately after taking them, and there will then be time for further Q & A and group discussion with faculty.
  • During in-class practicums, students must provide yoga therapy interventions in a safe and appropriate manner, in accordance with the IAYT Competencies for providing yoga therapy (Section 4, Category 4.1), as determined by supervising faculty. Students are given immediate feedback from faculty and peers on all aspects of their observational, assessment, decision-making, planning, teaching and record-keeping skills.
  • Satisfactory completion of the Home Practice Assignment. Students are given written feedback by supervising faculty, along with an offer to speak in person or by phone in addition. If the expected standard of satisfactory performance (set by IAYT Standards and Competencies) is not met, then students will be given additional guidance and assignments as needed until they can demonstrate the expected competency.
  • If any of the above requirements or expectations are not met, the student will be counseled and/or given additional assignments in order to help them be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance.

Reading Assignments

Ananda Yoga Therapy Training: Health Challenges-2 Manual. The Expanding Light, 2018.
In Yoga as Medicine, Chapters:
10 –Asthma
14 –Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
16 –Diabetes
17 –Fibromyalgia
18 -Headache
19 –Heart Disease
26 –Multiple Sclerosis
27 –Obesity

SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Musculoskeletal-2

Course Hours: Total = 41 (Residential and Distance)

  • Residential: 31 (with 13 hours Practicum)
  • Distance: 10 (pre-course Distance Module)
  • Practicum: 13 (Residential)

Prerequisites

  • Enrollment in the Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training program, AND,
  • Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Principles, AND,
  • Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Musculoskeletal-1

Teaching Format

Prior to the residential section of this course, students will be required to view online yoga training videos, which include Power Point and lecture, case studies, therapeutic intervention instruction, professional development and assignment information. Students will be required to do a number of tasks such as note taking during the online case studies, take quizzes, write reflection essays and do research on an assigned topic, which will culminate in a live talk/presentation during the residential aspect of their program. During the residential portion of the course there will be follow-up on the assignments from the online training, as well as their practicum, which was assigned in Musculoskeletal I. All students are required to participate in the discussions. They will be trained in more acute care and hands on training. Private session and group sessions training will include lots of time for students to practice teaching with peer and faculty observation and feedback. There will be a clinic/practicum where they will teach both group and private sessions under supervision of faculty with a focus on integrating and practicing learned concepts, techniques and skills.

Faculty

Nicole DeAvilla E-RYT 500, RPYT, RCYT, Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT

Required Texts/Reading Materials

Ananda Yoga Therapy Training: Musculoskeletal-1 Manual, 2018, which includes the Ananda Musculoskeletal Workbook, based on the work of Nicole DeAvilla, fully illustrated with drawings and photos by Barbara Bingham (140+ pages) handouts written by Ananda Faculty, articles, research papers, and forms for intake, evaluation and other resources. This binder is included with the course.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Competently work with student/clients with musculoskeletal issues in private session setting, a group class and group classes in hospital or clinic environments.
  • Design class plans as well as adapt their plans to new situations that student/clients may present.
  • Work with more acute cases and know when to refer to another health care provider.
  • Apply a wide variety of yoga therapy interventions to best suit the needs of the musculoskeletal compromised client/student.
  • Demonstrate the ability to research unfamiliar conditions and be able to present and discuss with peers and other health care providers your findings as well know how to assist your clients with the condition.
These learning objectives will be demonstrated through their assignments and in class participation and practicum.

Course Description

This course focuses on integrating subject matter learned and putting it into practical use for student/clients with primarily musculoskeletal issues. It builds upon the knowledge gained in Musculoskeletal I and their assigned practicum experiences. Anatomy and physiology are reviewed in the context of working with clients and communicating with health care providers. Students will have opportunities to practice intake, evaluating, critical thinking skills, communication, lead and teach appropriate yoga therapy techniques including both subtle and gross interventions, conduct sessions, provide daily living advice, and give homework/home routines as appropriate to clients’ needs, constitution and circumstances, and follow-up.

The course mainly focuses on the competencies in section 3 and 4. However, integration of other competencies is included.

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Disease
1.3.1 Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy, including the concepts of
1.3.1.1 panca maya (kosha) (fundamental structure of the human system);
1.3.1.2 subtle anatomy;
1.3.1.3 tri-dosha (effect of the elements on the physical body);
1.3.1.4 tri-guna (effect of sattva (equilibrium), rajas (activity), tamas [(inertia]);
1.3.1.5 prakrti/vikrti (dosha constitution at birth/imbalance of the dosha currently expressed in the body);
1.3.1.6 ama (undigested food, emotions, etc. accumulated in the body);
1.3.1.7 agni (internal fire(s) and their contribution to health);
1.3.1.8 prana vayu (prana, apana, vyana, udana,samana);
1.3.1.9 prana prakopa (disturbance of the vayu);
1.3.1.10 surya/chandra (sun/moon);
1.3.1.11 brmhana/langhana (expansion/contraction); and
1.3.1.12 vyuha model: heya (the symptoms), hetu (the causes), hana (the goal), upaya (the tools).
1.3.2 Knowledge of categorizing illness, including
1.3.2.1 Development/evolution of disease (samprapti [pathogenisis], including but not limited to direction, intensity, onset, and duration and their influence on the ease or difficulty of healing and disease management.
1.3.2.2 Setting priorities: symptoms/pacification (shamana [short term]) and purification/strengthening (shodhana [long term]).

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.1 Knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, including all major systems of the body and their interrelationships, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.2 Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3 Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.1 Familiarity with commonly used drugs and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.2.2 Familiarity with common medical terminology.
2.2.3 Knowledge of how to reference current healthcare information relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including pathologies, disorders, drugs, and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
2.4.2 Familiarity with the influence of familial, social, cultural, and religious conditioning on mental and medical perspectives of health and healing.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Practices
3.1.1 In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.1 Asana (postures);
3.1.2.2 Pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 Meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation), and ritualized activities such as nyasa and mudra; and
3.1.2.4 Vihara (lifestyle modifications) including basic yogic dietary concepts.
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.2. Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of, and observed capacity for, well-developed communication skills:
listening, presence, directive and non-directive dialogue.
3.2.2. Demonstrated ability to recognize, adjust, and adapt to specific client/student needs in the evolving therapeutic/professional relationship.
3.2.3. Demonstrated ability to recognize and manage the subtle dynamics inherent in the therapist/client relationship.
3.2.4. In-depth Knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy and how to assess the need for referral to other professional services.

Category 3.3. Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.4. Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1. Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 4. Practicum

Category 4.1. Provide Yoga Therapy
4.1.1. Demonstrated ability to conduct intake and assess the client/student, including
4.1.1.1. Taking a history of the client and his/her condition(s); and
4.1.1.2. Assessing the current condition using the tools relevant to the yoga therapist, including an evaluation of the physical, energetic, mental, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of well-being.
4.1.2. Demonstrated ability to elicit the goals, expectations, and aspirations of the client/student.
4.1.3. Demonstrated ability to integrate information from the intake, evaluation, and observation to develop a working assessment of the client's condition, limitations, and possibilities.
4.1.4. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.5. Demonstrated ability to identify priorities and set both long- and short-term goals with the client/student.
4.1.6. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of pacification, purification, and strengthening strategies.
4.1.7. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of strategies that address common disorders and pathologies of the major human systems and common mental health conditions, as well as other goals and aspirations of the student as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
4.1.8. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9. Demonstrated knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10. Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11. Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice, including
4.1.11.1. providing instruction, demonstration, education of the client/student using multimodal strategies of education such as auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learning tools; and
4.1.11.2. Providing supportive strategies for the client/student to actively participate in his/her practice, such as a means to remember his/her practice (e.g., auditory and visual tools).
4.1.12. Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships including
4.1.12.1. Fostering trust by establishing an appropriate therapeutic environment through privacy, confidentiality, and safety; and
4.1.12.2. Practicing effective, client/student-centered communication based upon a respect for, and sensitivity to, individual, familial, cultural, social, ethnic, and religious factors.
4.1.13. Demonstrated ability to provide follow up and re-planning, including
4.1.13.1. Gathering feedback, re-assess, and refine the practice and to determine short-term and long-term goals and priorities;
4.1.13.2. Addressing new and changing conditions, goals, aspirations, and priorities of the student/client and to provide appropriate support; and
4.1.13.3. Providing appropriate closure for the therapy sessions.

Section 5. Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.2. In-depth knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles of health care codes of conduct and yoga's ethical principles.
5.1.3. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles and related concepts from the yoga tradition to professional interactions and relationships.
5.1.4 In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy, resulting in the demonstrated ability to discern the need for referral to other modalities.
5.1.5. Knowledge of the extent of one's own individual training, skills, and evolving experience in yoga therapy, and knowledge of the importance of practicing within such parameters.

Category 5.2. Legal, Regulatory, and Business Issues Pertaining to Yoga Therapy
5.2.1 Knowledge of current relevant local, state, and national laws and regulations impacting the work of a yoga therapist.
5.2.2 Basic knowledge of business practices relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including record keeping, planning, and financial management.

Category 5.3. Relationships with Peers, Mentors, Clinicians, and
Organizations

5.3.1. Basic knowledge of other healthcare fields and their potential role in and relevance to the work of a yoga therapist.
5.3.2. Basic knowledge of how to establish, maintain, and utilize a referral network of peers and related healthcare practitioners and organizations.
5.3.3. Basic knowledge of how to develop and maintain ongoing collaborative relationships.

Category 5.4. Personal and Professional Development and Continuing Education
5.4.1. Knowledge of the fundamental value of ongoing personal practice, long-term mentorship, and skills maintenance/development through continuing education.
5.4.2. Knowledge of when and how to seek advice and support for case consultation, educational advancement, and personal practice.

Course Completion Requirements

Assignments given in the online portion of the training include, note taking, answering questions, reflection, quizzes and research of an assigned musculoskeletal issue. These assignments are to be completed and handed in electronically 2-4 weeks before the residential portion. During the residential portion students must give a short talk 5-10 minutes on their assigned musculoskeletal issue. They must complete all observed practicum hours of the course and deliver musculoskeletal yoga therapy interventions to meet the IAYT competencies and the level of care and safety and spiritual sensitivity required of Ananda Yoga Therapists. There will be ongoing assessment of their skills throughout the course. Safety for clients is a priority.

To pass students need to be assessed at 80% or higher. If they fall below these expectations they will be given additional assignments and/or be required to complete some or all of the course (which may incur additional residential costs) or complete extra assignments to demonstrate adequate improvement and competency.


SYLLABUS
Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training: Holistic Health Therapist Training

Course Hours: Total = 49 (Residential and Distance)

  • Residential: 37 (with 11 hours Practicum)
  • Distance: 12 (as Home Practice)
  • Practicum: 23 (11 Residential, 12 Distance)

Prerequisite

Enrollment in the Ananda Yoga® Therapy Training.
This should be one of the last courses that the Ananda Yoga Therapist Trainee takes in the curriculum as it draws on skills from all the previous modules.

Teaching Format

This is a 5-day residential course which includes a combination of lecture, discussion, experiential, mentored practicum with clients. (residential and distance)

Course Description

In many ways, the Ananda Holistic Health program is the course that most essentially captures the whole of Ananda Yoga Therapy. It is a program that incorporates the most important healing modalities of Ananda Yoga Therapy in a Holistic Health framework for our guests at The Expanding Light. Participants have daily guided practices of Energization Exercises, yoga postures, and meditation, daily vigorous affirmation walks, guided yoga techniques for greater energy, therapeutic and restorative yoga, instruction in a meditation technique, a comprehensive reference manual for holistic radiant health, 3 delicious and healthy vegetarian meals daily, Menus and recipes for healthy meals to take home with you, individual coaching/counseling to help you create a plan for healthy changes in your lifestyle.

Yoga Therapy Trainees participate as teaching/coaching assistants in this guest program that has been offered at The Expanding Light since 2009. Therapist trainees receive mentoring by faculty in coaching to help clients make lifestyle changes. Trainees also attend classes on meditation, affirmation/visualization, brain plasticity, positive attitudes, diet, purification and toxin free living with clients followed by separate meetings with faculty to learn how to set up these classes as part of their therapeutic yoga offering in their own community setting Being able to work with the same clients going through a transformational experience over a 5 day residential training offers many unique learning opportunities

Faculty: Ananda Ministers

Nayaswami Mangala Loper-Powers RN, MN, NP, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT
Maitri Jones, RN, BSN, E-RYT 500, Ananda Yoga Therapist, C-IAYT
Nayaswami Mantradevi LoCicero, Ananda Yoga and Meditation Teacher, Spiritual Counselor

Required Texts/Reading Materials

Ananda Holistic Health Manual. The Expanding Light, 2018.

Learning Objectives

At the completion of the course, students will:

  • Demonstrate practical client assessment skills (including structural and functional assessment, basic Ayurvedic constitution assessment)
  • Demonstrate ability to take a client history, create, document, and evaluate individualized therapeutic plans
  • Learn how to design individualized yoga therapy regimes
  • Demonstrate understanding of the importance of the power of the mind; the use of affirmations, visualizations, and mantra.
  • Understand how to establish therapeutic relationships with clients, how to set clear boundaries; what are professional and ethical boundaries; listening and communication skills.

Subject Matter/IAYT Competencies Covered

Section 1. Yoga Foundations

Category 1.1. Yoga Teachings and Philosophy
1.1.1 Familiarity with the evolution of the teachings and philosophy of the yoga tradition and its relevance and application to yoga therapy, including teachingsfrom Vedic and post-Vedic periods, Samkhya,Yoga,Tantra, and Ayurveda.

Category 1.2. Yoga and the Mind
1.2.1 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on the structure, states, functioning, and conditions of the mind.
1.2.1.1 drashtr (seer), drshya (seen);
1.2.1.2 antahkarana citta (consciousness), buddhi (intellect), ahamkara (ego), manas (mind);
1.2.1.3 citta vrtti (activities of the mind), citta pariama (structural changes in the mind),vyutthana/nirodha (mind’s potential for distraction and focus);
1.2.1.4 artha (cognition), bhava (mood), svabhava (inborn nature), vasana (residue of experience),samskara (conditioned pattern of thinking and behavior);
1.2.2 Knowledge of yoga perspectives on distracted/disturbed conditions of mind and their expressions as expressed in such texts as the Yoga Sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, and other texts.
1.2.2.3 duhkha and daurmanasya (suffering/discomfort and negative attitude/thinking), sarupyam (identification with the contents of the mind or seer taking the same form as the mind); and

Category 1.3. Framework for Health and Disease
1.3.1 Knowledge of the basic perspectives on health and disease from yoga and Ayurveda relevant to the practice of yoga therapy, including the concepts of
1.3.1.2 subtle anatomy;
1.3.1.3 tri-dosha (effect of the elements on the physical body);
1.3.1.4 tri-guna (effect of sattva (equilibrium), rajas (activity), tamas [inertia]);
1.3.1.6 ama (undigested food, emotions, etc. accumulated in the body);
1.3.1.7 agni (internal fire(s) and their contribution to health);
1.3.2 Knowledge of categorizing illness.

Section 2. Biomedical and Psychological Foundations

Category 2.1. Anatomy and Physiology
2.1.2 Knowledge of biomechanics and movement as they relate to the practice of yoga and the work of a yoga therapist.
2.1.3 Knowledge of common pathologies and disorders of all the major systems, including symptoms, management, illness trajectories, and contraindications, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.2. Additional Biomedical Knowledge
2.2.1 Familiarity with commonly used drugs and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
2.2.2 Familiarity with common medical terminology.
2.2.3 Knowledge of how to reference current healthcare information relevant to the work of a yoga therapist, including pathologies, disorders, drugs, and surgical procedures, as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.3. Psychology and Mental Health
2.3.1 Basic knowledge of commonly occurring mental health conditions—from psychological distress to psychiatric conditions—their symptoms, and common approaches/interventions, as they relate to the work of a yoga therapist.

Category 2.4. Additional Knowledge
2.4.1 Familiarity with models of human development, including developmental stages, lifecycles, and personality, and their importance to medical and psychological health and well-being
2.4.2 Familiarity with the influence of familial, social, cultural, and religious conditioning on mental and medical perspectives of health and healing.

Category 2.5. Body and Mind Integration
2.5.1 Knowledge of the interaction of the body, breath, mind, intellect, and emotions in health and well-being.

Section 3. Yoga Therapy Tools and Therapeutic Skills

Category 3.1. Yoga Practices
3.1.1 In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
3.1.2 In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
3.1.2.2 Pranayama (regulated breathing);
3.1.2.3 Meditation and relaxation techniques such as bhavana (visualization), mantra (recitation), and ritualized activities such as nyasa and mudra; and
3.1.3 In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.

Category 3.2 Basic Principles of the Therapeutic Relationship
3.2.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.2.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.2.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.3 Principles and Skills for Educating Clients/Students
3.3.1. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to implement effective teaching methods, adapt to unique styles of learning, provide supportive and effective feedback, acknowledge the client's/student's progress, and cope with unique difficulties/successes.
3.3.2. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to transmit the value of self-awareness and self- responsibility throughout the therapeutic process.
3.3.3. In-depth knowledge of and demonstrated ability to develop and adjust appropriate practice strategies to the client/student.

Category 3.4 Principles and Skills for Working with Groups
3.4.1. Basic knowledge of and demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate group programs.
3.4.2. Familiarity with group dynamics and techniques, including communication skills, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries, as well as techniques to address the specific needs of individual participants, to the degree possible in a group setting.

Section 4. Practicum

Category 4.1 Providing Yoga Therapy
4.1.1. In-depth knowledge of the application of yama and niyama.
4.1.2. In-depth knowledge of the range of yoga practices and their potential therapeutic effects for common conditions Practices may include, but are not limited to,
4.1.3. In-depth knowledge of contraindications of yoga practices for specific conditions and circumstances.
4.1.4. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to determine which aspects of the client/student's conditions, goals, and aspirations might be addressed through yoga therapy.
4.1.5. Demonstrated ability to identify priorities and set both long- and short-term goals with the client/student.
4.1.6. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of pacification, purification, and strengthening strategies.
4.1.7. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of strategies that address common disorders and pathologies of the major human systems and common mental health conditions, as well as other goals and aspirations of the student as relevant to the work of a yoga therapist.
4.1.8. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of how to combine intake, evaluation, observations, and working assessment to develop an appropriate practice or session strategy for individual clients/students as well as group classes, taking into consideration the holistic nature of the individual.
4.1.9.. Demonstrated knowledge of how to choose and prioritize the use of yoga tools and techniques, including selecting, sequencing, adapting, and modifying yoga practices appropriate to the needs of clients.
4.1.10. Demonstrated ability to teach or deliver the appropriate practices for individuals as well as groups, taking into consideration the assessment of their conditions, limitations, possibilities, and the overall practice strategy.
4.1.11. Demonstrated ability to facilitate the client/student's experience of the practice, including
4.1.12. Demonstrated ability to develop and maintain therapeutic relationships
4.1.13. Demonstrated ability to provide follow up and re-planning, including

Section 5 Professional Practice

Category 5.1. Ethical Principles
5.1.1. In-depth knowledge of yoga practices and methods for self-inquiry related to establishing, practicing, and maintaining ethical principles.
5.1.2. In-depth knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles of health care codes of conduct and yoga's ethical principles.
5.1.3. Demonstrated ability to apply knowledge of generally accepted ethical principles and related concepts from the yoga tHHition to professional interactions and relationships.
5.1.4. In-depth knowledge of the scope of practice of yoga therapy, resulting in the demonstrated ability to discern the need for referral to other modalities.
5.1.5. Knowledge of the extent of one's own individual training, skills, and evolving experience in yoga therapy, and knowledge of the importance of practicing within such parameters.

Category 5.3. Relationships with Peers, Mentors, Clinicians, and Organizations
5.3.1. Basic knowledge of other healthcare fields and their potential role in and relevance to the work of a yoga therapist.
5.3.2. Basic knowledge of how to establish, maintain, and utilize a referral network of peers and related healthcare practitioners and organizations.
5.3.3. Basic knowledge of how to develop and maintain ongoing collaborative relationships.


Course Completion Requirements

Attendance at all lectures, participation in all discussions, case studies and practicums. Completion of required reading assignments, including the whole Ananda Holistic Health Manual. Understanding of material covered as demonstrated by satisfactory performance (80%) on in-class quizzes and reviewed practicum assignments.


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